An Australian Consensus on Infant Feeding Guidelines to Prevent Food Allergy: Outcomes From the Australian Infant Feeding Summit.

Netting, Merryn J, Campbell, Dianne E, Koplin, Jennifer J, Beck, Kathy M, McWilliam, Vicki, Dharmage, Shyamali C, Tang, Mimi L K, Ponsonby, Anne-Louise, Prescott, Susan L, Vale, Sandra, Loh, Richard K S, Makrides, Maria, Allen, Katrina J and Centre for Food and Allergy Research, the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, the National Allergy Strategy, and the Australian Infant Feeding Summit Consensus Group (2017) An Australian Consensus on Infant Feeding Guidelines to Prevent Food Allergy: Outcomes From the Australian Infant Feeding Summit.. The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice, 5 6: 1617-1624. doi:10.1016/j.jaip.2017.03.013


Author Netting, Merryn J
Campbell, Dianne E
Koplin, Jennifer J
Beck, Kathy M
McWilliam, Vicki
Dharmage, Shyamali C
Tang, Mimi L K
Ponsonby, Anne-Louise
Prescott, Susan L
Vale, Sandra
Loh, Richard K S
Makrides, Maria
Allen, Katrina J
Centre for Food and Allergy Research, the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, the National Allergy Strategy, and the Australian Infant Feeding Summit Consensus Group
Title An Australian Consensus on Infant Feeding Guidelines to Prevent Food Allergy: Outcomes From the Australian Infant Feeding Summit.
Journal name The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice
ISSN 2213-2201
Publication date 2017-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jaip.2017.03.013
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 5
Issue 6
Start page 1617
End page 1624
Total pages 8
Abstract Infant feeding in the first postnatal year of life has an important role in an infant's risk of developing food allergy. Consumer infant feeding advice is diverse and lacks consistency.

The Australian Infant Feeding Summit was held with the aim of achieving national consensus on the wording of guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention.

Two meetings were hosted by the Centre for Food and Allergy Research, the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, and the Australian National Allergy Strategy. The first meeting of 30 allergy researchers, clinicians, and consumers assessed the evidence. The second consensus meeting involved 46 expert stakeholders including state and federal health care agencies, consumers, and experts in allergy, infant feeding, and population health.

Partner stakeholders agreed on consensus wording for infant feeding advice: CONCLUSIONS: Consensus was achieved in a context in which there is a high prevalence of food allergy. Guidelines for other countries are being updated. Provision of consistent wording related to infant feeding to reduce food allergy risk will ensure clear consumer advice.
Keyword Clinical guidelines
Evidence-based research
Food allergy
Health education
Infant feeding
Knowledge translation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Pubmed Import
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Nov 2017, 12:37:45 EST