Redefining the sponge-symbiont acquisition paradigm: sponge microbes exhibit chemotaxis towards host-derived compounds

Tout, Jessica, Astudillo-García, Carmen, Taylor, Michael W, Tyson, Gene W, Stocker, Roman, Ralph, Peter J, Seymour, Justin R and Webster, Nicole S (2017) Redefining the sponge-symbiont acquisition paradigm: sponge microbes exhibit chemotaxis towards host-derived compounds. Environmental microbiology reports, 9 6: 750-755. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12591


Author Tout, Jessica
Astudillo-García, Carmen
Taylor, Michael W
Tyson, Gene W
Stocker, Roman
Ralph, Peter J
Seymour, Justin R
Webster, Nicole S
Title Redefining the sponge-symbiont acquisition paradigm: sponge microbes exhibit chemotaxis towards host-derived compounds
Journal name Environmental microbiology reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1758-2229
Publication date 2017-09-11
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1758-2229.12591
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 9
Issue 6
Start page 750
End page 755
Total pages 6
Place of publication HOBOKEN
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
1101 Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
Abstract Marine sponges host stable and species-specific microbial symbionts that are thought to be acquired and maintained by the host through a combination of vertical transmission and filtration from the surrounding seawater. To assess whether the microbial symbionts also actively contribute to the establishment of these symbioses, we performed in situ experiments on Orpheus Island, Great Barrier Reef, to quantify the chemotactic responses of natural populations of seawater microorganisms towards cellular extracts of the reef sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. Flow cytometry analysis revealed significant levels of microbial chemotaxis towards R. odorabile extracts and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing showed enrichment of 'sponge-specific' microbial phylotypes, including a cluster within the Gemmatimonadetes and another within the Actinobacteria. These findings infer a potential mechanism for how sponges can acquire bacterial symbionts from the surrounding environment and suggest an active role of the symbionts in finding their host.
Keyword Rhopaloeides Odorabile
Coral-Reef
Vertical Transmission
Natural-Populations
Community
Microorganisms
Diversity
Evolution
Bacteria
Insights
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID #3801
FT120100480
FT130100218
RGY0089
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Pubmed Import
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Nov 2017, 12:24:08 EST