Prioritization of Marine Turtle Management Projects: A Protocol that Accounts for Threats to Different Life History Stages

Klein, Carissa J., Beher, Jutta, Chaloupka, Milani, Hamann, Mark, Limpus, Colin and Possingham, Hugh P. (2017) Prioritization of Marine Turtle Management Projects: A Protocol that Accounts for Threats to Different Life History Stages. Conservation Letters, 10 5: 547-554. doi:10.1111/conl.12324


Author Klein, Carissa J.
Beher, Jutta
Chaloupka, Milani
Hamann, Mark
Limpus, Colin
Possingham, Hugh P.
Title Prioritization of Marine Turtle Management Projects: A Protocol that Accounts for Threats to Different Life History Stages
Journal name Conservation Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1755-263X
Publication date 2017-09-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1111/conl.12324
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue 5
Start page 547
End page 554
Total pages 8
Place of publication HOBOKEN
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
2303 Ecology
2309 Nature and Landscape Conservation
Abstract Project prioritization protocols are an important tool for allocating conservation resources efficiently, and have been applied to a range of species and ecosystems. Current approaches are inadequate when applied to species with distinct threats impacting different and/or multiple life history stages, such as sea turtles. We develop a model that integrates the benefit of any management project on a population by way of its expected population growth rate, including projects targeting different and/or multiple life history stages. To illustrate its utility, we prioritize projects for investment relevant to Australia's eastern population of Flatback turtle (Natator depressus). We rely upon expert-elicitation to estimate individual benefit parameters, feasibility, and cost, and calculate the cost-effectiveness of each project. The most cost-effective project was not the most feasible, cheapest, or most beneficial. Our approach will help managers make efficient decisions that account for the full range of threats operating on a population.
Keyword Conservation
cost-effectiveness
Flatback turtle
Great Barrier Reef
land-sea planning
life history
marine turtles
prioritization
return on investment
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DP 110102153
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Nov 2017, 09:17:51 EST