Comparison of microbial communities across sections of a corroding sewer pipe and the effects of wastewater flooding

Cayford, Barry I., Jiang, Guangming, Keller, Jurg, Tyson, Gene and Bond, Philip L. (2017) Comparison of microbial communities across sections of a corroding sewer pipe and the effects of wastewater flooding. Biofouling, 33 9: 780-792. doi:10.1080/08927014.2017.1369050


Author Cayford, Barry I.
Jiang, Guangming
Keller, Jurg
Tyson, Gene
Bond, Philip L.
Title Comparison of microbial communities across sections of a corroding sewer pipe and the effects of wastewater flooding
Journal name Biofouling   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1029-2454
0892-7014
Publication date 2017-09-28
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08927014.2017.1369050
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 33
Issue 9
Start page 780
End page 792
Total pages 13
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Language eng
Subject 1104 Aquatic Science
2402 Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
2312 Water Science and Technology
Abstract This study investigated the variation in microbially induced concrete corrosion communities at different circumferential locations of a real sewer pipe and the effects of a wastewater flooding event on the community. Three distinct microbial community groups were found in different corrosion samples. The physico-chemical properties of the corrosion layers and the microbial communities were distinct for the cross-sectional positions within the pipe, ie ceiling, wall and tidal zones. The microbial communities detected from the same positions in the pipe were consistent over the length of the pipe, as well as being consistent between the replicate pipes. The dominating ceiling communities were members of the bacterial orders Rhodospirillales, Acidithiobacillales, Actinomycetales, Xanthomonadales and Acidobacteriales. The wall communities were composed of members of the Xanthomonadales, Hydrogenophilales, Chromatiales and Sphingobacteriales. The tidal zones were dominated by eight bacterial and one archaeal order, with the common physiological trait of anaerobic metabolism. Sewage flooding within the sewer system did not change the tidal and wall communities, although the corrosion communities in ceiling samples were notably different, becoming more similar to the wall and tidal samples. This suggests that sewage flooding has a significant impact on the corrosion community in sewers.
Keyword Concrete
Corrosion
Flooding
Hydrogen sulfide
Microbial community
Sewer
Wastewater
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DE170100694
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 03 Nov 2017, 09:08:11 EST