Estimating the landscape distribution of eggs by Helicoverpa spp., with implications for Bt resistance management

Parry, H. R., Paull, C. A., Zalucki, M. P., Ives, A. R., Hulthen, A. and Schellhorn, N. A. (2017) Estimating the landscape distribution of eggs by Helicoverpa spp., with implications for Bt resistance management. Ecological Modelling, 365 129-140. doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2017.10.004


Author Parry, H. R.
Paull, C. A.
Zalucki, M. P.
Ives, A. R.
Hulthen, A.
Schellhorn, N. A.
Title Estimating the landscape distribution of eggs by Helicoverpa spp., with implications for Bt resistance management
Formatted title
Estimating the landscape distribution of eggs by Helicoverpa spp., with implications for Bt resistance management
Journal name Ecological Modelling   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0304-3800
1872-7026
Publication date 2017-10-25
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2017.10.004
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 365
Start page 129
End page 140
Total pages 12
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2302 Ecological Modelling
Abstract Transgenic crops expressing insecticidal toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been deployed in agricultural landscapes around the globe. While the key strategy to delay resistance is the mandatory planting of a non-Bt refuge crop that is preferred by the target pest, the efficacy of this resistance management strategy across different landscape contexts over time is rarely considered. Here, we develop an individual-based model to simulate the spatio-temporal distribution of a highly mobile, polyphagous, global pest, Helicoverpa spp, across agricultural landscapes dominated by transgenic cotton. The simulation model allows us to explore refuge ‘electivity’, the relative utilization of refuge habitat by female Helicoverpa, in relation to Bt cotton habitat. Refuge electivity is an emergent function of egg distributions resulting from individual moth behavior, within multiple landscapes during different seasons and crop phenology. The individual-based model is validated against independent data collected from the field. Our findings suggest that refuge electivity is sensitive to the spatial and temporal context of the attractiveness of host crops in the landscape and the preferences of the moths. The attractiveness of mandated refuges, such as pigeon pea relative to Bt cotton, influences how effective they are in the landscape. Dynamics between other host crops, such as sorghum, also play an important role that varies over time and space. We use the model to identify scenarios where refuge strategies are likely to be most effective in terms of boosting susceptible populations and increasing landscape movement (genetic mixing). This dynamic approach has potential to inform better refuge design for Bt resistance management across a wide range of landscape contexts. For example, these findings justify the removal of sorghum as an option for mandated refuge in the Risk Management Plan (RMP) for Bt cotton in Australia.
Keyword Agent-based models
Area-wide management
Lepidoptera
Movement ecology
Repast Simphony
Spatio-temporal dynamics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID CSE1302
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Nov 2017, 09:02:54 EST