Fine-scale spatial genetic correlation analyses reveal strong female philopatry within a brush-tailed rock-wallaby colony in southeast Queensland

Hazlitt, S. L., Eldridge, M. D. B. and Goldizen, A. W. (2004) Fine-scale spatial genetic correlation analyses reveal strong female philopatry within a brush-tailed rock-wallaby colony in southeast Queensland. Molecular Ecology, 13 12: 3621-3632. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2004.02342.x


Author Hazlitt, S. L.
Eldridge, M. D. B.
Goldizen, A. W.
Title Fine-scale spatial genetic correlation analyses reveal strong female philopatry within a brush-tailed rock-wallaby colony in southeast Queensland
Journal name Molecular Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-1083
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2004.02342.x
Volume 13
Issue 12
Start page 3621
End page 3632
Total pages 12
Editor H. Smith
L. Rieseberg
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
270203 Population and Ecological Genetics
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract We combine spatial data on home ranges of individuals and microsatellite markers to examine patterns of fine-scale spatial genetic structure and dispersal within a brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata) colony at Hurdle Creek Valley, Queensland. Brush-tailed rock-wallabies were once abundant and widespread throughout the rocky terrain of southeastern Australia; however, populations are nearly extinct in the south of their range and in decline elsewhere. We use pairwise relatedness measures and a recent multilocus spatial autocorrelation analysis to test the hypotheses that in this species, within-colony dispersal is male-biased and that female philopatry results in spatial clusters of related females within the colony. We provide clear evidence for strong female philopatry and male-biased dispersal within this rock-wallaby colony. There was a strong, significant negative correlation between pairwise relatedness and geographical distance of individual females along only 800 m of cliff line. Spatial genetic autocorrelation analyses showed significant positive correlation for females in close proximity to each other and revealed a genetic neighbourhood size of only 600 m for females. Our study is the first to report on the fine-scale spatial genetic structure within a rock-wallaby colony and we provide the first robust evidence for strong female philopatry and spatial clustering of related females within this taxon. We discuss the ecological and conservation implications of our findings for rock-wallabies, as well as the importance of fine-scale spatial genetic patterns in studies of dispersal behaviour.
Keyword Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Dispersal
Female Philopatry
Genetic Structure
Macropod
Rock-wallaby
Spatial Microsatellite
Wombat Lasiorhinus-krefftii
Kangaroo Macropus-giganteus
Petrogale-xanthopus Gray
Sex-biased Dispersal
Social-structure
Population-structure
Reproductive Success
Autocorrelation Analysis
Microsatellite Analysis
Relatedness Structure
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:14:54 EST