Responses to neighbours and non-neighbours in the buff-banded rail (Gallirallus philippensis): no dear-enemy relationships

Lachish, S. and Goldizen, A. W. (2004) Responses to neighbours and non-neighbours in the buff-banded rail (Gallirallus philippensis): no dear-enemy relationships. Australian Journal of Zoology, 52 4: 369-378. doi:10.1071/ZO03029


Author Lachish, S.
Goldizen, A. W.
Title Responses to neighbours and non-neighbours in the buff-banded rail (Gallirallus philippensis): no dear-enemy relationships
Journal name Australian Journal of Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-959X
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/ZO03029
Volume 52
Issue 4
Start page 369
End page 378
Total pages 10
Editor D. McGlashan
Place of publication Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
270707 Sociobiology and Behavioural Ecology
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Territorial individuals often respond less aggressively to intrusions by their neighbours than to intrusions by unfamiliar individuals. This commonly observed strategy, the dear-enemy phenomenon, is thought to minimise the costs associated with territory defence. This study determined whether an insular population of territory-holding buff-banded rails (Gallirallus philippensis) exhibits dear-enemy relationships and whether males and females differ in their responses to neighbours and non-neighbours. Playback techniques were used to examine and compare the vocalisations and movements of focal individuals in response to the territorial advertisement calls of their neighbours and of unfamiliar individuals (non-neighbours). Results showed that focal birds did not respond differently to the calls of neighbours and non-neighbours; thus, no evidence for the dear-enemy phenomenon was found in this species. We suggest that this result is due to the significant threats posed by neighbours to territory owners in this territorial system, in addition to a high level of territorial instability in the population. Males and females were shown to differ qualitatively in their general territorial response to intruders but not in their relative responses to neighbours and non-neighbours, suggesting that the relative threats posed by neighbours and non-neighbours do not differ between the sexes.
Keyword Zoology
Stranger Discrimination
Individual Recognition
Differential Responses
Territorial Defense
Rana-catesbeiana
Behavior
Playback
Floaters
Voice
Attrition
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:14:52 EST