Meeting in the middle: Improving communication in primary health care consultations with people with an intellectual disability

Ziviani, J., Lennox, N., Allison, H., Lyons, M. and Del Mar, C. (2004) Meeting in the middle: Improving communication in primary health care consultations with people with an intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, 29 3: 211-225. doi:10.1080/13668250412331285163


Author Ziviani, J.
Lennox, N.
Allison, H.
Lyons, M.
Del Mar, C.
Title Meeting in the middle: Improving communication in primary health care consultations with people with an intellectual disability
Journal name Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1366-8250
Publication date 2004-01-01
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13668250412331285163
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 3
Start page 211
End page 225
Total pages 15
Editor R. J. Stancliffe
Place of publication UK
Publisher Carfax
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
Abstract The increased presence and participation in Australian society of people with an intellectual disability provides challenges for the provision of primary health care. General practitioners (GPs) identify themselves as ill equipped to provide for this heterogeneous population. A major obstacle to the provision of appropriate health care is seen as inadequate communication between the GP and the person with an intellectual disability, who may or may not be accompanied by a carer or advocate. This qualitative study in which five GPs, three people with intellectual disability, seven carers and two advocates (parent and friend) were interviewed was conducted in Brisbane, Australia. The aim was to better understand the factors that have an impact upon the success of communication in a medical consultation. Findings suggested that GPs were concerned with the aspects of communication difficulties which influenced their ability to adequately diagnose, manage and inform patients. Implications for practice management were also identified. People with intellectual disability reported frustration when they felt that they could not communicate adequately with the GP and annoyance when they were not included in the communication exchange. Carers were strong advocates for the person with intellectual disability, but indicated insufficient skill and knowledge to provide the level of assistance required in the consultation. The outcome was a model of cooperation that outlined the responsibilities of all players in the medical encounter, prior to, during and after the event.
Keyword Education, Special
Rehabilitation
Learning-disability
Experience
Adults
Needs
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 54 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 55 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:14:34 EST