The feasibility and acceptability of high-intensity interval training for adults with mental illness: a pilot study

Chapman, Justin J., Coombes, Jeff S., Brown, Wendy J., Khan, Asaduzzaman, Chamoli, Suneel, Pachana, Nancy A. and Burton, Nicola W. (2017) The feasibility and acceptability of high-intensity interval training for adults with mental illness: a pilot study. Mental Health and Physical Activity, . doi:10.1016/j.mhpa.2017.09.007

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Author Chapman, Justin J.
Coombes, Jeff S.
Brown, Wendy J.
Khan, Asaduzzaman
Chamoli, Suneel
Pachana, Nancy A.
Burton, Nicola W.
Title The feasibility and acceptability of high-intensity interval training for adults with mental illness: a pilot study
Journal name Mental Health and Physical Activity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1755-2966
1878-0199
Publication date 2017-09-23
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2017.09.007
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction

Adults with mental illness have increased risk of cardiovascular disease. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is more efficacious than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) for improving cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF); however, the utility of HIIT for this group is unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the feasibility and acceptability of HIIT and MICT in adults with mental illness. A secondary aim was to compare the efficacy of HIIT and MICT on mental health and fitness.

Method

Inactive adults with self-reported mental illness participated in aerobic exercise three times/week over 12 weeks. Participants were randomised to HIIT (3x4-min bouts at 85–95% maximum heart rate [HRmax] interspersed with 3-min recovery bouts) or MICT (1 × 30-min at 65–75% HRmax). Feasibility was assessed using attendance and withdrawal rates. Acceptability and mental health was assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Fitness was measured using indirect calorimetry during a graded fitness test to exhaustion.
Results

24 participants consented and 16 participants began the intervention (HIIT, n = 8; MICT, n = 8). Completion rates (HIIT, n = 4; MICT, n = 5) and median attendances were similar (HIIT = 81%, MICT = 86%). Most participants were satisfied with their allocation (88% MICT; 100% HIIT), and found the exercise enjoyable (63% MICT; 100% HIIT). Equal numbers reported that they would like to continue the exercise (63%), and that they would feel confident doing so without supervision (75%). No significant differences were found between groups on mental health and fitness.

Conclusion

This preliminary evidence suggests that HIIT was as acceptable and feasible as MICT for adults with mental illness.
Keyword HIIT
Aerobic exercise
Exercise intervention
Mental health
Pilot study
Randomised controlled trial
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 26 Oct 2017, 10:03:18 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences