Evidence for a direct relationship between cognitive and physical change during an education intervention in people with chronic low back pain

Moseley, G. Lorimer (2004) Evidence for a direct relationship between cognitive and physical change during an education intervention in people with chronic low back pain. European Journal of Pain, 8 1: 39-45. doi:10.1016/S1090-3801(03)00063-6


Author Moseley, G. Lorimer
Title Evidence for a direct relationship between cognitive and physical change during an education intervention in people with chronic low back pain
Journal name European Journal of Pain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1090-3801
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S1090-3801(03)00063-6
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 8
Issue 1
Start page 39
End page 45
Total pages 7
Editor F. Cervero
Place of publication London
Publisher Saunders
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730104 Nervous system and disorders
Formatted abstract
Background. Unhelpful pain cognitions of patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) may limit physical performance and undermine physical assessment. It is not known whether a direct relationship exists between pain cognitions and physical performance.

Aims. To determine if a relationship exists between change in pain cognitions and change in physical performance when chronic LBP patients participate in a single one-to-one education intervention during which they have no opportunity to be active.

Methods. In a quasi-experiment using a convenience sample, moderately disabled chronic LBP patients (n=121) participated in a one-to-one education session about either lumbar spine physiology or pain physiology. Multiple regression analysis evaluated the relationship between change in pain cognitions measured by the survey of pain attitudes (SOPA) and the pain catastrophising scale (PCS) and change in physical performance, measured by the straight leg raise (SLR) and standing forward bending range.

Results. There was a strong relationship between cognitive change and change in straight leg raise (SLR) and forward bending (r=0.88 and 0.79, respectively, P<0.01), mostly explained by change in the conviction that pain means tissue damage and catastrophising.

Conclusions. Change in pain cognitions is associated with change in physical performance, even when there is no opportunity to be physically active. Unhelpful pain cognitions should be considered when interpreting physical assessments.
Keyword Anesthesiology
Clinical Neurology
Neurosciences
Chronic Pain
Cognitions
Education
Physical Assessment
Pain Attitudes
Predictors
Therapy
Program
Beliefs
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 130 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:12:01 EST