Get healthy after breast cancer - examining the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of referring breast cancer survivors to a general population telephone-delivered program targeting physical activity, healthy diet and weight loss

Lawler, S., Maher, G., Brennan, M., Goode, A., Reeves, M. M. and Eakin, E. (2017) Get healthy after breast cancer - examining the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of referring breast cancer survivors to a general population telephone-delivered program targeting physical activity, healthy diet and weight loss. Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 6: 1953-1962. doi:10.1007/s00520-017-3599-6


Author Lawler, S.
Maher, G.
Brennan, M.
Goode, A.
Reeves, M. M.
Eakin, E.
Title Get healthy after breast cancer - examining the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of referring breast cancer survivors to a general population telephone-delivered program targeting physical activity, healthy diet and weight loss
Journal name Supportive Care in Cancer   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0941-4355
1433-7339
Publication date 2017-06-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3599-6
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 25
Issue 6
Start page 1953
End page 1962
Total pages 10
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject 2730 Oncology
Abstract Purpose: This pilot study assessed the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of referring breast cancer survivors to the ‘Get Healthy Service’ (GHS), a state health-funded 6-month telephone-delivered lifestyle program. Methods: Pre-post study with eligible and consenting women following treatment for stages I–III breast cancer referred by nurses in a cancer treatment centre to the GHS. Feasibility was assessed via GHS uptake and completion; acceptability was assessed via patient satisfaction and nurse feedback. Changes in weight, physical activity, diet, quality of life (QoL) and fatigue from baseline to 6 months were examined. Results: Fifty-three women (mean ± SD body mass index, 31.0 ± 5.5 kg/m; age, 57.3 ± 10.0 years; 14.0 ± 7.1 months post-diagnosis; 43.4% born outside Australia, 49% high school or less education, 32.1% English as a second language) took up the GHS, with 62% completing the program. Almost all (92%) completers had high satisfaction ratings and breast nurses provided positive feedback. Findings from GHS completers (n = 33) show a statistically significant effect from baseline to 6 months for weight loss (mean ± SE; −2.4 ± 0.7 kg; p = 0.002) and total physical activity minutes per week (55 ± 18 min/week; p = 0.006). No significant changes in fruit or vegetable servings per day or takeaways and fast food frequency per week were observed. A significant improvement in mental QoL was observed (3.5 ± 1.6; p = 0.041), but not for physical QoL or fatigue. Conclusion: GHS referral appeared feasible, acceptable and effective for a diverse group of women following completion of treatment for breast cancer, yet more remains to be done to fully integrate GHS screening and referral into usual care.
Keyword Breast cancer
Diet
Exercise
Physical activity
Survivorship
Telephone coaching
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

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Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Tue, 10 Oct 2017, 18:10:06 EST by Cathy Swart on behalf of School of Public Health