Use of a psychoeducational skill training DVD program to reduce stress in Chinese Australian and Singaporean dementia caregivers: a pilot study

Chua, Jocelyn and Pachana, Nancy A. (2016) Use of a psychoeducational skill training DVD program to reduce stress in Chinese Australian and Singaporean dementia caregivers: a pilot study. Clinical Gerontologist, 39 1: 3-14. doi:10.1080/07317115.2015.1101634


Author Chua, Jocelyn
Pachana, Nancy A.
Title Use of a psychoeducational skill training DVD program to reduce stress in Chinese Australian and Singaporean dementia caregivers: a pilot study
Journal name Clinical Gerontologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0731-7115
1545-2301
Publication date 2016-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/07317115.2015.1101634
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 39
Issue 1
Start page 3
End page 14
Total pages 12
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract Caring for a relative with dementia places caregivers at increased risk for psychological distress and adverse physical outcomes. Research on Chinese caregivers, and effective means of support for this group, is limited. This pilot study investigates effectiveness of a home-based psychoeducational skills training culturally tailored to increase coping among Chinese dementia caregivers. Twelve Chinese family caregivers, from Australia and Singapore (11 female) between 41 and 80years old, completed the 8-week program. Measures of coping and psychological distresswere administered at baseline, mid-point and post-intervention. Caregivers encountered less problem behaviors in care recipients and were less distressed by their disruptive behaviors after completing the program; caregiver anxiety, depression, and worry appraisal remained unchanged. Feedback highlighted the value of culturally customized support.
Keyword Geriatrics & Gerontology
Gerontology
Psychiatry
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Psychiatry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Paper is listed in WoS, but no add button due to identical title of DPsych thesis currently in eSpace (UQ:314468). Same title, but different publication.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 28 Sep 2017, 12:41:42 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology