Effect of sex, hunger and relative body size on the use of ripple signals in the interactions among water striders Gerris latiabdominis

Son, Jae Hak, Han, Chang Seok, Lee, Sang-im and Jablonski, Piotr G. (2014) Effect of sex, hunger and relative body size on the use of ripple signals in the interactions among water striders Gerris latiabdominis. Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology, 17 4: 653-658. doi:10.1016/j.aspen.2014.06.013


Author Son, Jae Hak
Han, Chang Seok
Lee, Sang-im
Jablonski, Piotr G.
Title Effect of sex, hunger and relative body size on the use of ripple signals in the interactions among water striders Gerris latiabdominis
Formatted title
Effect of sex, hunger and relative body size on the use of ripple signals in the interactions among water striders Gerris latiabdominis
Journal name Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1226-8615
1876-7990
Publication date 2014-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aspen.2014.06.013
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 17
Issue 4
Start page 653
End page 658
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Water striders use ripple signals in aggressive interactions between individuals for access to food. We asked whether water striders produce ripple signals more frequently when they are hungrier and when the value of food resources is higher. We also asked if and how the use of signals depends on the size difference between interacting individuals. We found that females used ripple signals more often than males did. The experiment suggested that use of aggressive ripple signals is affected by hunger in females – the sex with high demands for food resources. Among females, but not males, we found out that the probability of using signals in response to the approaching intruder depended both on the degree of hunger and on the size of the focal animal relative to the size of the intruder. Before starvation, the probability of a female using a signal in an interaction with an intruder was higher when the individual's size was larger relative to the intruder. After starvation, the focal individuals were more likely to signal when their size was smaller relative to the intruder. The results are consistent with the idea that these signals may reveal information about the signalers weight or hunger level, and specific hypotheses are suggested for the future studies.
Keyword Water striders
Body size
Ripple signal
Aggression
Sex
Starvation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 20 Sep 2017, 17:26:00 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences