The effects of mining machinery noise of different frequencies on the behaviour, faecal corticosterone and tissue morphology of wild mice (Mus musculus)

Mancera, Karen F., Lisle, Allan, Allavena, Rachel and Phillips, Clive J. C. (2017) The effects of mining machinery noise of different frequencies on the behaviour, faecal corticosterone and tissue morphology of wild mice (Mus musculus). Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 197 81-89. doi:10.1016/j.applanim.2017.08.008

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Author Mancera, Karen F.
Lisle, Allan
Allavena, Rachel
Phillips, Clive J. C.
Title The effects of mining machinery noise of different frequencies on the behaviour, faecal corticosterone and tissue morphology of wild mice (Mus musculus)
Formatted title
The effects of mining machinery noise of different frequencies on the behaviour, faecal corticosterone and tissue morphology of wild mice (Mus musculus)
Journal name Applied Animal Behaviour Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-1591
1872-9045
Publication date 2017-08-31
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.applanim.2017.08.008
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 197
Start page 81
End page 89
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 3403 Food Animals
1103 Animal Science and Zoology
Abstract Mining noise has a wide variety of frequency spectra and is a potential source of stress for wildlife. We evaluated the effects of mining machinery noise on behaviour and associated physiological parameters at two isoenergetic frequency ranges: high (>2 kHz) and low (≤2 kHz), the latter being less audible to mice, our model species. Effects of these two frequency spectra on behaviour, organ morphology and faecal corticosterone of wild mice were compared with a control treatment with no extra auditory stimuli. The mice exposed to high frequency noise spent less time in their nest than those exposed to low frequency noise or those in the control treatment, and they spent more time circling, especially anticlockwise, which in conjunction with elevated faecal corticosterone levels may reflect a greater right brain hemisphere stress-related response, particularly in females. Low frequency mining noise reduced grooming and circling, suggesting decreased physiological arousal due to mild stress. Low frequencies were also associated with increased faecal corticosterone in males compared to controls, which may be related to gender-based differences of the ear canal that affect frequency sensitivity. In conclusion, high frequency and low frequency mining machinery noise produced stress-related responses that may be important for the animals’ welfare and survival.
Keyword Anthropogenic noise
Circling
Low frequency
High frequency
Mining
Stress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 20 Sep 2017, 14:40:16 EST by Annette Winter on behalf of School of Veterinary Science