Early life secondhand smoke exposure assessed by hair nicotine biomarker may reduce children's neurodevelopment at 2 years of age

N.N.Mohamed N.N.MohamedNur NadiaN.N.Mohamed N.MohamedNur Nadiahttps://api.elsevier.com/content/author/author_id/57191621246 (2018) Early life secondhand smoke exposure assessed by hair nicotine biomarker may reduce children's neurodevelopment at 2 years of age. Science of The Total Environment, 610-611 147-153. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.030


Author N.N.Mohamed N.N.MohamedNur NadiaN.N.Mohamed N.MohamedNur Nadiahttps://api.elsevier.com/content/author/author_id/57191621246
Title Early life secondhand smoke exposure assessed by hair nicotine biomarker may reduce children's neurodevelopment at 2 years of age
Journal name Science of The Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 18791026 00489697
Publication date 2018-01-01
Year available 2018
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.030
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 610-611
Start page 147
End page 153
Total pages 7
Place of publication AMSTERDAM
Publisher Elsevier B.V.
Language eng
Abstract Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) can affect fetal brain development as well as subsequent neurodevelopment. This study aimed to determine the association between prenatal and postnatal SHS exposure with children's neurodevelopment at 2 years of age. Among 107 mother-child pairs from a Malaysia prospective cohort, prenatal and postnatal SHS exposure was determined based on maternal and child hair nicotine concentrations. Multiple linear regressions were used to determine the association between prenatal and postnatal levels of nicotine in maternal and children's' hair with children's neurodevelopment. After adjustment for confounders, prenatal nicotine concentration levels were negatively associated with communication (beta = -2.059; p = 0.015) and fine motor skills (beta = -2.120; p = 0.002) while postnatal nicotine concentration levels were inversely associated with fine motors (beta = -0.124; p = 0.004) and problemsolving skills (beta = -0.117; p = 0.013). In conclusion, this study suggests that early life exposure to SHS may affect children's neurodevelopment. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Children
Hair nicotine
Neurodevelopment
Postnatal
Prenatal
Secondhand smoke
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
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Created: Tue, 19 Sep 2017, 00:15:25 EST by Web Cron