Microbial network, phylogenetic diversity and community membership in the active layer across a permafrost thaw gradient

Mondav, Rhiannon, McCalley, Carmody K., Hodgkins, Suzanne B., Frolking, Steve, Saleska, Scott R., Rich, Virginia I., Chanton, Jeff P. and Crill, Patrick M. (2017) Microbial network, phylogenetic diversity and community membership in the active layer across a permafrost thaw gradient. Environmental Microbiology, 19 8: 3201-3218. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.13809


Author Mondav, Rhiannon
McCalley, Carmody K.
Hodgkins, Suzanne B.
Frolking, Steve
Saleska, Scott R.
Rich, Virginia I.
Chanton, Jeff P.
Crill, Patrick M.
Title Microbial network, phylogenetic diversity and community membership in the active layer across a permafrost thaw gradient
Journal name Environmental Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1462-2920
1462-2912
Publication date 2017-08-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1462-2920.13809
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 19
Issue 8
Start page 3201
End page 3218
Total pages 18
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2404 Microbiology
1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Abstract Biogenic production and release of methane (CH) from thawing permafrost has the potential to be a strong source of radiative forcing. We investigated changes in the active layer microbial community of three sites representative of distinct permafrost thaw stages at a palsa mire in northern Sweden. The palsa site (intact permafrost and low radiative forcing signature) had a phylogenetically clustered community dominated by Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria. The bog (thawing permafrost and low radiative forcing signature) had lower alpha diversity and midrange phylogenetic clustering, characteristic of ecosystem disturbance affecting habitat filtering. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens and Acidobacteria dominated the bog shifting from palsa-like to fen-like at the waterline. The fen (no underlying permafrost, high radiative forcing signature) had the highest alpha, beta and phylogenetic diversity, was dominated by Proteobacteria and Euryarchaeota and was significantly enriched in methanogens. The Mire microbial network was modular with module cores consisting of clusters of Acidobacteria, Euryarchaeota or Xanthomonodales. Loss of underlying permafrost with associated hydrological shifts correlated to changes in microbial composition, alpha, beta and phylogenetic diversity associated with a higher radiative forcing signature. These results support the complex role of microbial interactions in mediating carbon budget changes and climate feedback in response to climate forcing.
Keyword Microbiology
Microbiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DE-SC0004632
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 18 Sep 2017, 01:00:30 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)