Effects of resistance training on measures of muscular strength in people with Parkinson's Disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Roeder, Luisa, Costello, Joseph T., Smith, Simon S., Stewart, Ian B. and Kerr, Graham K. (2015) Effects of resistance training on measures of muscular strength in people with Parkinson's Disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS One, 10 7: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0132135


Author Roeder, Luisa
Costello, Joseph T.
Smith, Simon S.
Stewart, Ian B.
Kerr, Graham K.
Title Effects of resistance training on measures of muscular strength in people with Parkinson's Disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2015-07-06
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0132135
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue 7
Total pages 23
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Abstract Objective
Formatted abstract
Objective

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the overall effect of resistance training (RT) on measures of muscular strength in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Methods

Controlled trials with parallel-group-design were identified from computerized literature searching and citation tracking performed until August 2014. Two reviewers independently screened for eligibility and assessed the quality of the studies using the Cochrane risk-of-bias-tool. For each study, mean differences (MD) or standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for continuous outcomes based on between-group comparisons using post-intervention data. Subgroup analysis was conducted based on differences in study design.

Results

Nine studies met the inclusion criteria; all had a moderate to high risk of bias. Pooled data showed that knee extension, knee flexion and leg press strength were significantly greater in PD patients who undertook RT compared to control groups with or without interventions. Subgroups were: RT vs. control-without-intervention, RT vs. control-with-intervention, RT-with-other-form-of-exercise vs. control-without-intervention, RT-with-other-form-of-exercise vs. control-with-intervention. Pooled subgroup analysis showed that RT combined with aerobic/balance/stretching exercise resulted in significantly greater knee extension, knee flexion and leg press strength compared with no-intervention. Compared to treadmill or balance exercise it resulted in greater knee flexion, but not knee extension or leg press strength. RT alone resulted in greater knee extension and flexion strength compared to stretching, but not in greater leg press strength compared to no-intervention.

Discussion

Overall, the current evidence suggests that exercise interventions that contain RT may be effective in improving muscular strength in people with PD compared with no exercise. However, depending on muscle group and/or training dose, RT may not be superior to other exercise types. Interventions which combine RT with other exercise may be most effective. Findings should be interpreted with caution due to the relatively high risk of bias of most studies.
Keyword Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
 
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