Assessment method influences the severity and type of symptoms reported after self-reported mild traumatic brain injury

Edmed, Shannon L., Sullivan, Karen A., Allan, Alicia C. and Smith, Simon S. (2015) Assessment method influences the severity and type of symptoms reported after self-reported mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 37 6: 641-652. doi:10.1080/13803395.2015.1038984


Author Edmed, Shannon L.
Sullivan, Karen A.
Allan, Alicia C.
Smith, Simon S.
Title Assessment method influences the severity and type of symptoms reported after self-reported mild traumatic brain injury
Journal name Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1744-411X
1380-3395
Publication date 2015-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13803395.2015.1038984
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 6
Start page 641
End page 652
Total pages 12
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To investigate the influence of assessment method (spontaneous report versus checklist) on the report of postconcussive syndrome (PCS) symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Setting: Community. Participants: Thirty-six participants (58% female) with postacute self-reported mTBI (i.e., sustained 1–6 months prior to participation) and 36 age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched controls with no history of mTBI. Design: Cross-sectional. Main measures: Spontaneous symptom report from open-ended questions and checklist endorsed symptoms from the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (both measures administered online). Results: Assessment method significantly affected individual symptom item frequencies (small to large effects), the number of symptoms reported, the total severity score, domain severity scores (i.e., somatic/sensory, cognitive, and affective symptom domains), and the number of participants who met a PCS caseness criterion (large effects; checklist > spontaneous report). The types of symptoms that were different between the groups differed for the assessment methods: Compared to controls, the nonclinical mTBI group spontaneously reported significantly greater somatic/sensory and cognitive domain severity scores, whilst no domain severity scores differed between groups when endorsed on a checklist. Conclusions: Assessment method can alter the number, severity, and types of symptoms reported by individuals who have sustained an mTBI and could potentially influence clinical decisions.
Keyword Concussion
Mild traumatic brain injury
Postconcussive syndrome
Head injuries
Self-report symptoms
Neurobehavioral symptom inventory
Assessment
Subjective symptoms
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
 
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