Characterising the mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental human hookworm infection

Gaze, Soraya, McSorley, Henry J., Daveson, James, Jones, Di, Bethony, Jeffrey M., Oliveira, Luciana M., Speare, Richard, McCarthy, James S., Engwerda, Christian R., Croese, John and Loukas, Alex (2012) Characterising the mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental human hookworm infection. PLoS Pathogens, 8 2: . doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002520


Author Gaze, Soraya
McSorley, Henry J.
Daveson, James
Jones, Di
Bethony, Jeffrey M.
Oliveira, Luciana M.
Speare, Richard
McCarthy, James S.
Engwerda, Christian R.
Croese, John
Loukas, Alex
Title Characterising the mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental human hookworm infection
Journal name PLoS Pathogens   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1553-7366
1553-7374
Publication date 2012-02-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1002520
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 2
Total pages 11
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Abstract The mucosal cytokine response of healthy humans to parasitic helminths has never been reported. We investigated the systemic and mucosal cytokine responses to hookworm infection in experimentally infected, previously hookworm naive individuals from non-endemic areas. We collected both peripheral blood and duodenal biopsies to assess the systemic immune response, as well as the response at the site of adult worm establishment. Our results show that experimental hookworm infection leads to a strong systemic and mucosal Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) response, with some evidence of a Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) response. Despite upregulation after patency of both IL-15 and ALDH1A2, a known Th17-inducing combination in inflammatory diseases, we saw no evidence of a Th17 (IL-17) response. Moreover, we observed strong suppression of mucosal IL-23 and upregulation of IL-22 during established hookworm infection, suggesting a potential mechanism by which Th17 responses are suppressed, and highlighting the potential that hookworms and their secreted proteins offer as therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Faculty of Medicine
 
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