Bioconjugation approaches to produce subunit vaccines composed of protein or peptide antigens and covalently attached toll-like receptor ligands

Xu, Zhenghui and Moyle, Peter Michael (2017) Bioconjugation approaches to produce subunit vaccines composed of protein or peptide antigens and covalently attached toll-like receptor ligands. Bioconjugate Chemistry, . doi:10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.7b00478

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Author Xu, Zhenghui
Moyle, Peter Michael
Title Bioconjugation approaches to produce subunit vaccines composed of protein or peptide antigens and covalently attached toll-like receptor ligands
Journal name Bioconjugate Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1520-4812
1043-1802
Publication date 2017-09-11
Year available 2017
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.7b00478
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Abstract Traditional vaccines derived from attenuated or inactivated pathogens are effective at inducing antibody-based protective immune responses, but tend to be highly reactogenic, causing notable adverse effects. Vaccines with superior safety profiles can be produced by subunit approaches, utilizing molecularly defined antigens (e.g. proteins and polysaccharides). These antigens, however, often elicit poor immunological responses, necessitating the use of adjuvants. Immunostimulatory adjuvants have the capacity to activate antigen presenting cells directly through specific receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors (TLRs)), resulting in enhanced presentation of antigens as well as secretion of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Consequently, innate immune responses are amplified and adaptive immunity is generated. Recently, site-specific conjugation of such immunostimulatory adjuvants (e.g. TLR ligands) onto defined antigens has shown superior efficacy over unconjugated mixtures, suggesting that the development of chemically-characterized immunostimulatory adjuvants and optimized approaches for their conjugation with antigens may provide a better opportunity for the development of potent, novel vaccines. This review briefly summarizes various TLR agonists utilized as immunostimulatory adjuvants and focuses on the development of techniques (e.g. recombinant; synthetic, and semisynthetic) for generating adjuvant-antigen fusion vaccines incorporating peptide or protein antigens.
Keyword Biotechnology
Organic Chemistry
Bioengineering
Pharmacology
Pharmaceutical Science
Biomedical Engineering
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID
2014002917
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 12 Sep 2017, 08:54:30 EST by Peter Moyle on behalf of School of Pharmacy