Wing bone stresses in free flying bats and the evolution of skeletal design for flight

S.M.Swartz S.M.SwartzSharon M.S.M.Swartz S.SwartzSharon M.https://api.elsevier.com/content/author/author_id/7101619335 (1992) Wing bone stresses in free flying bats and the evolution of skeletal design for flight. Nature, 359 6397: 726-729. doi:10.1038/359726a0


Author S.M.Swartz S.M.SwartzSharon M.S.M.Swartz S.SwartzSharon M.https://api.elsevier.com/content/author/author_id/7101619335
Title Wing bone stresses in free flying bats and the evolution of skeletal design for flight
Journal name Nature   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0028-0836
Publication date 1992-01-01
Year available 1992
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/359726a0
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 359
Issue 6397
Start page 726
End page 729
Total pages 4
Place of publication LONDON
Publisher MACMILLAN MAGAZINES LTD
Language eng
Abstract THE primary mechanical functions of limb bones are to resist deformation, and hence provide stiff levers against which muscles can act, and to be sufficiently strong to prevent breaking under static or dynamic loads which arise from normal and accidental activities1. if bones perform these functions with a minimum amount of material, the energetic costs associated with building, maintaining and transporting the skeleton will be minimized2. Appropriate skeletal architecture for minimizing mass while maximizing strength depends on forces imposed on structural elements. In the evolutionary acquisition of flight in the bat lineage, the forelimb skeleton must have come to experience locomotor-forces that differed from those engendered by the terrestrial locomotion of non-flying bat relatives. Here we successfully measure in vivo strain on the wing bones of flying mammals. Our data demonstrate that torsion and shear are unique and crucial features of skeletal biomechanics during flight, and suggest that the evolution of skeletal design in bats and other flying vertebrates may be driven b the need to resist these loads.
Keyword Invivo Stress
Horse Equus
Strain
Mechanics
Locomotion
Radius
Speed
Tibia
Gait
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 100 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 112 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 12 Sep 2017, 00:04:40 EST by System User