Ultrasonic dispersion of soil in water: The effect of suspension properties on energy dissipation and soil dispersion

S.R.Raine S.R.RaineS.R.Raine S.RaineS. R.https://api.elsevier.com/content/author/author_id/7003736558 (1994) Ultrasonic dispersion of soil in water: The effect of suspension properties on energy dissipation and soil dispersion. Australian Journal of Soil Research, 32 6: 1157-1174. doi:10.1071/SR9941157


Author S.R.Raine S.R.RaineS.R.Raine S.RaineS. R.https://api.elsevier.com/content/author/author_id/7003736558
Title Ultrasonic dispersion of soil in water: The effect of suspension properties on energy dissipation and soil dispersion
Journal name Australian Journal of Soil Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9573
Publication date 1994-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/SR9941157
Volume 32
Issue 6
Start page 1157
End page 1174
Total pages 18
Language eng
Subject 2304 Environmental Chemistry
1111 Soil Science
Abstract The application of ultrasonic energy to soil-water suspensions for particle size analysis has been widely adopted and more recently applied to aggregate stability assessment. However, suspension properties have been reported to affect both the energy applied and the degree of aggregate breakdown. This paper investigates the effect of suspension concentration, suspension volume, gas saturation, depth of ultrasonic probe insertion and particle size distribution on the power (energy per unit time) applied by an ultrasonic probe. It also investigates the effect of suspension concentration, suspension volume, gas saturation and method of wetting the soil on the dispersion produced by ultrasonic energy applications. Where the power applied was expressed per unit soil mass, the quantity of dispersed material released by ultrasonic action was not affected by either the volume or concentration of the suspension. However, decreasing the dissolved gas concentration in suspension decreased the dispersion produced. The method of soil wetting significantly affected initial disruption but had no effect on the maximum amount of <2 and <20 gm material produced by sonification. The power applied by the ultrasonic probe was found to decrease with suspension temperature, increase with dissolved gas concentration and increase with the depth of probe insertion. Recommendations are made on the range of suspension properties that should be used for standard measurements of aggregate stability assessment using ultrasonic energy.
Keyword Aggregate stability
Disaggregation
Dispersion
Dispersive energy
Ultrasound
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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