Estimating the number of adults with severe and persistent mental illness who have complex, multi-agency needs

Whiteford, Harvey, Buckingham, Bill, Harris, Meredith, Diminic, Sandra, Stockings, Emily and Degenhardt, Louisa (2017) Estimating the number of adults with severe and persistent mental illness who have complex, multi-agency needs. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51 8: 799-809. doi:10.1177/0004867416683814


Author Whiteford, Harvey
Buckingham, Bill
Harris, Meredith
Diminic, Sandra
Stockings, Emily
Degenhardt, Louisa
Title Estimating the number of adults with severe and persistent mental illness who have complex, multi-agency needs
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Publication date 2017-08-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0004867416683814
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 51
Issue 8
Start page 799
End page 809
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract Objective: A population health approach to mental health service planning requires estimates that align interventions with the needs of people with mental illness. The primary objective was to estimate the number of people in Australia living with severe and persistent mental illness who have complex, multi-agency needs. The secondary objective was to describe the possible service needs of individuals with severe mental illness.
Formatted abstract
Objective:
A population health approach to mental health service planning requires estimates that align interventions with the needs of people with mental illness. The primary objective was to estimate the number of people in Australia living with severe and persistent mental illness who have complex, multi-agency needs. The secondary objective was to describe the possible service needs of individuals with severe mental illness.

Methods:
We disaggregated the estimated 12-month prevalence of adults with severe mental illness into needs-based sub-groups, using multiple data sources. Possible service needs of 1825 adults with psychotic disorders and 334 adults with severe past-year affective and/or anxiety disorders were described using data from the 2010 Survey of High Impact Psychosis and 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, respectively.

Results:
Using best available data, we estimated that 3.3% of adults experience a severe mental illness each year, of whom one-third (1.1% of adults) experience a persistent mental illness that requires ongoing services to address residual disability. Among those with severe and persistent mental illness, one-third of adults (0.4% or 59,000 adults in 2015) have complex needs requiring multi-agency support to maximise their health, housing, social participation and personal functioning. Survey of High Impact Psychosis data indicated that among adults with psychotic disorders, use of accommodation (40%), non-government (30%) services and receipt of income support (85%) services were common, as were possible needs for support with socialising, personal care and employment. National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing data indicated that among individuals with severe affective and anxiety disorders, receipt of income support (37%) was common (information on accommodation and non-government support services was not available), as were possible needs for financial management and employment support.

Conclusion:
Agreed indicators of complex, multi-agency needs are required to refine these estimates. Closer alignment of information collected about possible service needs across epidemiological surveys is needed.
Keyword Mental disorders
Severe and persistent mental illness
Health services
Policy
Planning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID APP1041131
APP1041742
APP1104600
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Sat, 09 Sep 2017, 00:20:00 EST by Ms Sandra Diminic on behalf of School of Public Health