Numerical investigation into the impact of CO2-water-rock interactions on CO2 injectivity at the Shenhua CCS Demonstration Project, China

Yang, Guodong, Li, Yilian, Atrens, Aleks, Yu, Ying and Wang, Yongsheng (2017) Numerical investigation into the impact of CO2-water-rock interactions on CO2 injectivity at the Shenhua CCS Demonstration Project, China. Geofluids, . doi:10.1155/2017/4278621

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ682561_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 4.34MB 0

Author Yang, Guodong
Li, Yilian
Atrens, Aleks
Yu, Ying
Wang, Yongsheng
Title Numerical investigation into the impact of CO2-water-rock interactions on CO2 injectivity at the Shenhua CCS Demonstration Project, China
Formatted title
Numerical investigation into the impact of CO2-water-rock interactions on CO2 injectivity at the Shenhua CCS Demonstration Project, China
Journal name Geofluids   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1468-8115
1468-8123
Publication date 2017-08-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1155/2017/4278621
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Total pages 17
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract A 100,000 t/year demonstration project for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage in the deep saline formations of the Ordos Basin, China, has been successfully completed. Field observations suggested that the injectivity increased nearly tenfold after CO2 injection commenced without substantial pressure build-up. In order to evaluate whether this unique phenomenon could be attributed to geochemical changes, reactive transport modeling was conducted to investigate CO2-water-rock interactions and changes in porosity and permeability induced by CO2 injection. The results indicated that using porosity-permeability relationships that include tortuosity, grain size, and percolation porosity, other than typical Kozeny-Carman porosity-permeability relationship, it is possible to explain the considerable injectivity increase as a consequence of mineral dissolution. These models might be justified in terms of selective dissolution along flow paths and by dissolution or migration of plugging fines. In terms of geochemical changes, dolomite dissolution is the largest source of porosity increase. Formation physical properties such as temperature, pressure, and brine salinity were found to have modest effects on mineral dissolution and precipitation. Results from this study could have practical implications for a successful CO2 injection and enhanced oil/gas/geothermal production in low-permeability formations, potentially providing a new basis for screening of storage sites and reservoirs.
Keyword Reactive surface-area
Deep saline aquifers
Geological sequestration
Co2-induced dissolution
Ordos Basin
Degrees-C
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Mechanical & Mining Engineering Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 04 Sep 2017, 01:00:49 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)