Orientation of the genetic variance-covariance matrix and the fitness surface for multiple male sexually selected traits

Blows, Mark W., Chenoweth, Stephen F. and Hine, Emma (2004) Orientation of the genetic variance-covariance matrix and the fitness surface for multiple male sexually selected traits. American Naturalist, 163 3: 329-340. doi:10.1086/381941

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Author Blows, Mark W.
Chenoweth, Stephen F.
Hine, Emma
Title Orientation of the genetic variance-covariance matrix and the fitness surface for multiple male sexually selected traits
Journal name American Naturalist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-0147
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/381941
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 163
Issue 3
Start page 329
End page 340
Total pages 12
Editor J. Losos
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher University of Chicago Press, Journals Division
Collection year 2004
Language eng
Subject C1
270207 Quantitative Genetics
780105 Biological sciences
060412 Quantitative Genetics (incl. Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)
06 Biological Sciences
Abstract Stabilizing selection has been predicted to change genetic variances and covariances so that the orientation of the genetic variance-covariance matrix (G) becomes aligned with the orientation of the fitness surface, but it is less clear how directional selection may change G. Here we develop statistical approaches to the comparison of G with vectors of linear and nonlinear selection. We apply these approaches to a set of male sexually selected cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of Drosophila serrata. Even though male CHCs displayed substantial additive genetic variance, more than 99% of the genetic variance was orientated 74.9degrees away from the vector of linear sexual selection, suggesting that open-ended female preferences may greatly reduce genetic variation in male display traits. Although the orientation of G and the fitness surface were found to differ significantly, the similarity present in eigenstructure was a consequence of traits under weak linear selection and strong nonlinear ( convex) selection. Associating the eigenstructure of G with vectors of linear and nonlinear selection may provide a way of determining what long-term changes in G may be generated by the processes of natural and sexual selection.
Keyword Ecology
Genetic Variance
Fitness Surface
Sexual Selection
Genetic Variance-covariance Matrix
Lek Paradox
Quantitative Genetics
Mate Recognition
Lek Paradox
Natural-selection
Directional Selection
Mating Preferences
Evolution
Characters
Consequences
Constraints
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:01:46 EST