Longitudinal association between physical activity engagement during adolescence and mental health outcomes in young adults: A 21-year birth cohort study

Suetani, Shuichi, Mamun, Abdullah, Williams, Gail M., Najman, Jake M., McGrath, John J. and Scott, James G. (2017) Longitudinal association between physical activity engagement during adolescence and mental health outcomes in young adults: A 21-year birth cohort study. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 94 116-123. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.06.013


Author Suetani, Shuichi
Mamun, Abdullah
Williams, Gail M.
Najman, Jake M.
McGrath, John J.
Scott, James G.
Title Longitudinal association between physical activity engagement during adolescence and mental health outcomes in young adults: A 21-year birth cohort study
Journal name Journal of Psychiatric Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-1379
0022-3956
Publication date 2017-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.06.013
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 94
Start page 116
End page 123
Total pages 8
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective
Previous studies provide mixed evidence that physical activity engagement (PAE) in adolescence is associated with later mental health outcomes. This study aimed to examine the association between PAE at age 14 and mental health outcomes at age 21 using a large birth cohort study.

Material and methods
Prospective data from the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy, consisting of 3493 young adults, were analyzed. PAE at age 14 was estimated using self-report, and participants were categorized into; (1) frequent, (2) infrequent, or (3) no PAE group. Mental health outcomes at age 21 consisted of; (1) common mental disorders, (2) psychosis-related outcomes, and, (3) emotional and behavioral problems. The association between PAE in adolescence and later mental health outcomes in young adulthood was examined using logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and adolescent psychopathology.

Results
No PAE at age 14 was associated with the increased likelihood of lifetime diagnosis of any affective disorder, elevated delusional ideation, and endorsement of visual perceptual disturbance at age 21. Conversely, infrequent PAE at age 14 was associated with the decreased likelihood of subsequent lifetime diagnosis of any substance use disorder.

Conclusion
Our findings suggest that lack of PAE in adolescence influences some, but not all, later mental health outcomes. Interventions to increase PAE in adolescence may represent an opportunity to prevent future mental health problems.
Keyword Common mental disorders
Epidemiology
Longitudinal study
Physical activity
Psychotic disorders
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 30 Aug 2017, 14:55:00 EST by Emma Schleiger on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)