The genetic covariance among clinal environments after adaptation to an environmental gradient in Drosophila serrata

Sgro, C. M. and Blows, M. W. (2004) The genetic covariance among clinal environments after adaptation to an environmental gradient in Drosophila serrata. Genetics, 167 3: 1281-1291. doi:10.1534/genetics.103.026120


Author Sgro, C. M.
Blows, M. W.
Title The genetic covariance among clinal environments after adaptation to an environmental gradient in Drosophila serrata
Journal name Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0016-6731
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1534/genetics.103.026120
Volume 167
Issue 3
Start page 1281
End page 1291
Total pages 11
Editor E.W. Jones
Place of publication Baltimore
Publisher Genetics Society of America
Language eng
Subject C1
270207 Quantitative Genetics
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract We examined the genetic basis of clinal adaptation by determining the evolutionary response of life-history traits to laboratory natural selection along a gradient of thermal stress in Drosophila serrata. A gradient of heat stress was created by exposing larvae to a heat stress of 36degrees for 4 hr for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 days of larval development, with the remainder of development taking place at 25degrees. Replicated lines were exposed to each level of this stress every second generation for 30 generations. At the end of selection, we conducted a complete reciprocal transfer experiment where all populations were raised in all environments, to estimate the realized additive genetic covariance matrix among clinal environments in three life-history traits. Visualization of the genetic covariance functions of the life-history traits revealed that the genetic correlation between environments generally declined as environments became more different and even became negative between the most different environments in some cases. One exception to this general pattern was a life-history trait representing the classic trade-off between development time and body size, which responded to selection in a similar genetic fashion across all environments. Adaptation to clinal environments may involve a number of distinct genetic effects along the length of the cline, the complexity of which may not be fully revealed by focusing primarily on populations at the ends of the cline.
Keyword Genetics & Heredity
Life-history Traits
Heat-shock-protein
Body-size
Thermal Evolution
Quantitative Genetics
Temperature Extremes
Correlated Responses
Artificial Selection
Melanogaster
Resistance
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:00:56 EST