Prevalence and correlates of suboptimal vitamin D status in people living with psychotic disorders: data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis

Suetani, Shuichi, Saha, Sukanta, Eyles, Darryl W., Scott, James G. and McGrath, John J. (2017) Prevalence and correlates of suboptimal vitamin D status in people living with psychotic disorders: data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51 9: 921-929. doi:10.1177/0004867416681853


Author Suetani, Shuichi
Saha, Sukanta
Eyles, Darryl W.
Scott, James G.
McGrath, John J.
Title Prevalence and correlates of suboptimal vitamin D status in people living with psychotic disorders: data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1614
0004-8674
Publication date 2017-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0004867416681853
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 51
Issue 9
Start page 921
End page 929
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject 2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Objective: Having sufficient sera concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is important for a range of health outcomes including cardiometabolic diseases. Clinical studies in people with psychotic disorders suggest that a sizable proportion has suboptimal vitamin D status (i.e. vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency). Individuals with psychosis also have many of the risk factors associated with suboptimal vitamin D status such as smoking, obesity, and reduced physical activity. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and socio-demographic and clinical correlates of vitamin D status using a large, population-based sample of adults with psychotic disorders.
Formatted abstract
Objective:
Having sufficient sera concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is important for a range of health outcomes including cardiometabolic diseases. Clinical studies in people with psychotic disorders suggest that a sizable proportion has suboptimal vitamin D status (i.e. vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency). Individuals with psychosis also have many of the risk factors associated with suboptimal vitamin D status such as smoking, obesity, and reduced physical activity. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and socio-demographic and clinical correlates of vitamin D status using a large, population-based sample of adults with psychotic disorders.

Methods:

Data were collected as part of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis, a population-based survey of Australians aged 18–64 years with a psychotic disorder. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentration was measured in 463 participants. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentration was dichotomised into optimal (above 50 nmol/L) and suboptimal (below 50 nmol/L). The influence of a range of socio-demographic and clinical variables on vitamin D status was examined using logistic regression.

Results:
Nearly half (43.6%) of the participants had suboptimal vitamin D status. Those with (a) increased physical activity or (b) positive symptoms had significantly reduced odds of having suboptimal vitamin D status. However, there were no significant associations between suboptimal vitamin D status and other psychiatric symptom measures or cardiometabolic risk factors.

Conclusion:
Many people with psychotic disorders have suboptimal vitamin D status. As part of the routine assessment of physical health status, clinicians should remain mindful of vitamin D status in this vulnerable population and encourage the use of appropriate vitamin D supplements.
Keyword Cardiometabolic Risk
Physical-Activity
D Supplementation
D Deficiency
New-Zealand
Schizophrenia
Metaanalysis
Illness
Reliability
Mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID APP1105807
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 24 Aug 2017, 15:34:44 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)