Anthropometric measures are not accurate predictors of fat mass in ALS

Ioannides, Zara A., Steyn, Frederik J., Henderson, Robert D., Mccombe, Pamela A. and Ngo, Shyuan T. (2017) Anthropometric measures are not accurate predictors of fat mass in ALS. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, 18 7-8: 486-491. doi:10.1080/21678421.2017.1317811

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Author Ioannides, Zara A.
Steyn, Frederik J.
Henderson, Robert D.
Mccombe, Pamela A.
Ngo, Shyuan T.
Title Anthropometric measures are not accurate predictors of fat mass in ALS
Journal name Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2167-9223
2167-8421
Publication date 2017-04-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/21678421.2017.1317811
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 18
Issue 7-8
Start page 486
End page 491
Total pages 6
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Abstract Anthropometric measurements including body mass index (BMI) and body adiposity index (BAI) are widely employed as indicators of fat mass (FM). Metabolic abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) impact disease progression, therefore assessment of FM informs care. The aim of this study was to determine whether BMI and BAI are accurate predictors of FM in ALS. Methodology and main findings: BMI, BAI and percentage FM (determined by air displacement plethysmography; FM-ADP) were measured in control (n = 35) and ALS (n = 44) participants. While BMI and BAI correlated significantly with FM-ADP, neither index provided an accurate estimate of FM. In longitudinally assessed ALS participants (n = 29; ∼six-month repeat assessment interval), although a change in BMI (r(2) = 0.62 r = 0.79 p < 0.01) and BAI (r(2) = 0.20 r = 0.44, p = 0.02) correlated with a change in FM-ADP, the anthropometric measures did not consistently reflect increases or decreases observed in FM-ADP.

Using FM-ADP as the standard, this study suggests that BMI and BAI are not accurate measures of FM in ALS. Furthermore, longitudinal assessments indicate that changes in BMI and BAI do not consistently reflect true changes of FM in ALS.
Formatted abstract
Background: Anthropometric measurements including body mass index (BMI) and body adiposity index (BAI) are widely employed as indicators of fat mass (FM). Metabolic abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) impact disease progression, therefore assessment of FM informs care. The aim of this study was to determine whether BMI and BAI are accurate predictors of FM in ALS.

Methodology and main findings: BMI, BAI and percentage FM (determined by air displacement plethysmography; FM-ADP) were measured in control (n = 35) and ALS (n = 44) participants. While BMI and BAI correlated significantly with FM-ADP, neither index provided an accurate estimate of FM. In longitudinally assessed ALS participants (n = 29; ∼six-month repeat assessment interval), although a change in BMI (r2 = 0.62 r = 0.79 p < 0.01) and BAI (r2 = 0.20 r = 0.44, p = 0.02) correlated with a change in FM-ADP, the anthropometric measures did not consistently reflect increases or decreases observed in FM-ADP.

Conclusions/significance: Using FM-ADP as the standard, this study suggests that BMI and BAI are not accurate measures of FM in ALS. Furthermore, longitudinal assessments indicate that changes in BMI and BAI do not consistently reflect true changes of FM in ALS.
Keyword Adiposity
Air displacement plethysmography
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Body adiposity index
Body mass index
Fat mass
Metabolic assessment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 11 Aug 2017, 10:56:56 EST by Emma Schleiger on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)