Photosynthetic responses of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) to light and sediment sulfide in a shallow barrier island lagoon

Goodman J.L., Moore K.A. and Dennison W.C. (1995) Photosynthetic responses of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) to light and sediment sulfide in a shallow barrier island lagoon. Aquatic Botany, 50 1: 37-47. doi:10.1016/0304-3770(94)00444-Q


Author Goodman J.L.
Moore K.A.
Dennison W.C.
Title Photosynthetic responses of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) to light and sediment sulfide in a shallow barrier island lagoon
Journal name Aquatic Botany   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0304-3770
Publication date 1995-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0304-3770(94)00444-Q
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 50
Issue 1
Start page 37
End page 47
Total pages 11
Language eng
Subject 1104 Aquatic Science
1110 Plant Science
Abstract Highly reducing sediments are prevalent in seagrass environments. Under anoxic conditions, hydrogen sulfide can accumulate as an end product of anaerobic respiration at levels which may be toxic to halophytes. The photosynthetic response of Zostera marina L. (eelgrass) to manipulations in sediment sulfide concentration and light regimes was examined in Chincoteague Bay in June 1991. Neutral density screens were used in a mesocosm experiment to decrease downwelling irradiance to 50 and 15% of insolation. Sediment sulfide levels were enriched using NaS and lowered using FeSO. Photosynthesis vs. irradiance (PI) relationships were determined experimentally at ten light levels throughout the 21 day experiment. Photoadaptation was detected in response to the previous 4 day light history of the plants, as maximum photosynthesis (P) decreased in response to lower daily light levels. Negative impacts of sulfide on eelgrass in this study were observed through reductions in P, increases in the light intensity at which gross photosynthesis equals respiration, and decreases in the initial slope of the PI curve. The effects of eutrophication through reduced light and increased sediment sulfide on P were additive. Elevated sediment sulfide levels may contribute to seagrass loss in stressed areas as the potential for utilization of available light is reduced.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
 
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