Using an acoustic telemetry array to assess fish volumetric space use: a case study on impoundments, hypoxia and an air-breathing species (Neoceratodus forsteri)

Roberts, D. T., Udyawer, V., Franklin, C., Dwyer, R. G. and Campbell, H. A. (2017) Using an acoustic telemetry array to assess fish volumetric space use: a case study on impoundments, hypoxia and an air-breathing species (Neoceratodus forsteri). Marine and Freshwater Research, 68 8: 1532-1543. doi:10.1071/MF16124


Author Roberts, D. T.
Udyawer, V.
Franklin, C.
Dwyer, R. G.
Campbell, H. A.
Title Using an acoustic telemetry array to assess fish volumetric space use: a case study on impoundments, hypoxia and an air-breathing species (Neoceratodus forsteri)
Formatted title
Using an acoustic telemetry array to assess fish volumetric space use: a case study on impoundments, hypoxia and an air-breathing species (Neoceratodus forsteri)
Journal name Marine and Freshwater Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1323-1650
1448-6059
Publication date 2017-01-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MF16124
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 68
Issue 8
Start page 1532
End page 1543
Total pages 12
Place of publication Clayton, VIC Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Facultative air-breathing fish can persist in hypoxic waters due to their capacity to acquire atmospheric oxygen. Most studies examining responses of air-breathing fish to aquatic hypoxia have occurred under experimental conditions. How air-breathing fish respond to hypoxic conditions in the field has received less attention. Using depth sensor transmitters and an array of acoustic receivers to monitor the facultative air-breathing Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri), we investigated habitat preferences and behavioural responses to seasonal hypoxic zones in a riverine impoundment. Three-dimensional (3-D) kernel utilisation distribution (KUD) models revealed that during stratified conditions, lungfish remained above the oxycline, rarely venturing into hypoxic waters, whereas during holomixis lungfish used a wider range of depths. Total volumetric space utilisation did not change significantly during stratified periods, but the distribution of space used changed, constrained by the oxycline. Despite N. forsteri having lungs to supplement oxygen requirements, the presence of a hypoxic zone constrained the core (50% 3-D-KUD) volumetric space used by lungfish to <1.6% of the total available space of the study area. With increasing demand for new impoundments in many tropical and subtropical regions, the present study provides insights to how air-breathing fish species may respond to altered riverine conditions from impoundments.
Keyword Habitat preference
Kernel utilisation distribution
Lungfish
Stratification
Vemco positioning system
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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