The relationship between physical activity, and physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning in older adults living in residential aged care facilities

Bootsman, Natalia J. M., Skinner, Tina L., Lal, Ravin, Glindemann, Delma, Lagasca, Carmela and Peeters, G. M. E. E. (Geeske) (2017) The relationship between physical activity, and physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning in older adults living in residential aged care facilities. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 21 2: 173-178. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2017.07.006

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Author Bootsman, Natalia J. M.
Skinner, Tina L.
Lal, Ravin
Glindemann, Delma
Lagasca, Carmela
Peeters, G. M. E. E. (Geeske)
Title The relationship between physical activity, and physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning in older adults living in residential aged care facilities
Journal name Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-2440
1878-1861
Publication date 2017-07-12
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.07.006
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 21
Issue 2
Start page 173
End page 178
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chatswood, NSW, Australia
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Insight into modifiable factors related to falls risk in older adults living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) is necessary to tailor preventive strategies for this high-risk population. Associations between physical activity (PA), physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning have been understudied in aged care residents. This study investigated associations between PA, and both physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning in older adults living in RACFs.

Cross-sectional study.

Forty-four residents aged 85±8years were recruited from four RACFs located in Southeast Queensland. PA was assessed as the average time spent walking in hours/day using activPAL3™. Physical performance tests included balance, gait speed, dual-task ability, reaction time, coordination, grip strength, and leg strength and power. Psycho-cognitive questionnaires included quality of life, balance confidence, fear of falling and cognitive functioning. Associations between PA and each outcome measure were analysed using linear or ordinal regression models.

The average time spent walking was 0.5±0.4h/day. Higher levels of PA were significantly associated with better balance (compared with low PA, medium: B=1.6; high: B=1.3) and dual-task ability (OR=7.9 per 0.5h/day increase). No statistically significant associations were found between PA and the other physical and psycho-cognitive measures.

More physically active residents scored higher on balance and dual-task ability, which are key predictors of falls risk. This suggests that physical activity programs targeting balance and dual-task ability could help prevent falls in aged care residents.
Formatted abstract
Objectives: Insight into modifiable factors related to falls risk in older adults living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) is necessary to tailor preventive strategies for this high-risk population. Associations between physical activity (PA), physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning have been understudied in aged care residents. This study investigated associations between PA, and both physical performance and psycho-cognitive functioning in older adults living in RACFs.

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Methods: Forty-four residents aged 85 ± 8 years were recruited from four RACFs located in Southeast Queensland. PA was assessed as the average time spent walking in hours/day using activPAL3™. Physical performance tests included balance, gait speed, dual-task ability, reaction time, coordination, grip strength, and leg strength and power. Psycho-cognitive questionnaires included quality of life, balance confidence, fear of falling and cognitive functioning. Associations between PA and each outcome measure were analysed using linear or ordinal regression models.

Results: 
The average time spent walking was 0.5 ± 0.4 h/day. Higher levels of PA were significantly associated with better balance (compared with low PA, medium: B = 1.6; high: B = 1.3) and dual-task ability (OR = 7.9 per 0.5 h/day increase). No statistically significant associations were found between PA and the other physical and psycho-cognitive measures.

Conclusions: 
More physically active residents scored higher on balance and dual-task ability, which are key predictors of falls risk. This suggests that physical activity programs targeting balance and dual-task ability could help prevent falls in aged care residents.
Keyword Frail elderly
Walking
Psychomotor performance
Psychological phenomena and processes
Residential facilities
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Aug 2017, 16:09:02 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences