The microvascular organization of the gas exchange organs of the Australian lungfish, neoceratodus forsteri (Krefft)

Gannon B.J., Randall D.J., Browning J., Lester R.J.G. and Rogers L.J. (1983) The microvascular organization of the gas exchange organs of the Australian lungfish, neoceratodus forsteri (Krefft). Australian Journal of Zoology, 31 5: 651-676. doi:10.1071/ZO9830651


Author Gannon B.J.
Randall D.J.
Browning J.
Lester R.J.G.
Rogers L.J.
Title The microvascular organization of the gas exchange organs of the Australian lungfish, neoceratodus forsteri (Krefft)
Journal name Australian Journal of Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1446-5698
Publication date 1983-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/ZO9830651
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 5
Start page 651
End page 676
Total pages 26
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
1103 Animal Science and Zoology
Abstract The general organization of the gill microvasculature of Neoceratodus is similar to that reported for elasmobranchs. A corpus cavernosum is situated between the afferent filamental artery and afferent lamellar arterioles. The microvascular network of the lamellar blood sheet consists of a series of major channels, curving in concentric arcs from afferent to efferent lamellar arterioles, with minor radial cross-connections between these major channels; the basal lamellar channels are not buried in the filament. The afferent filamental arteries also supply blood to the interbranchial septum, which extends almost to the filament tip. The water-blood barrier of 3-4 µm consists of up to three cells: the surface epithelial cell, the pillar cell flange. plus a frequently interposed interstitial cell; there is a prominent basal lamina immediately external to the pillar cell flange. Adjacent gill secondary lamellae are commonly fused at their free margins near the leading edge into groups of from two to five. The micro-organization of the pseudobranch is in general similar to that of the posterior holobranchs. The lung is divided into a series of air sacs by stout septae which contain large amounts of smooth muscle. The respiratory epithelium is of two types: a squamous epithelium underlain by a dense capillary sheet, and isolated patches of a columnar muco-ciliary epithelium associated with only few capillaries. The air-blood barrier (approximately 3 µm thick) consists of a squamous epithelial cell process and attenuated vesiculated endothelial cell cytoplasm, with two basal laminae and intervening interstitial space situated between these.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 25 Jul 2017, 00:03:52 EST by System User