Design of modular peptide surfactants and their surface activity

Wang, Hao-Fei, Wibowo, David, Shao, Zhengzhong, Middelberg, Anton P. J. and Chun-Xia Zhao (2017) Design of modular peptide surfactants and their surface activity. Langmuir, 33 32: 7957-7967. doi:10.1021/acs.langmuir.7b01382


Author Wang, Hao-Fei
Wibowo, David
Shao, Zhengzhong
Middelberg, Anton P. J.
Chun-Xia Zhao
Title Design of modular peptide surfactants and their surface activity
Journal name Langmuir   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0743-7463
1520-5827
Publication date 2017-08-15
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/acs.langmuir.7b01382
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 33
Issue 32
Start page 7957
End page 7967
Total pages 11
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Subject 2500 Materials Science
3104 Condensed Matter Physics
3110 Surfaces and Interfaces
1607 Spectroscopy
1603 Electrochemistry
Abstract Designed peptide surfactants offer a number of advanced properties over conventional petrochemical surfactants, including biocompatibility, sustainability, and tailorability of the chemical and physical properties through peptide design. Their biocompatibility and degradability make them attractive for various applications, particularly for food and pharmaceutical applications. In this work, two new peptide surfactants derived from an amphiphilic peptide surfactant (AM1) were designed (AM-S and C-AM) to better understand links between structure, interfacial activity, and emulsification. Based on AM1, which has an interfacial α-helical structure, AM-S and C-AM were designed to have two modules, that is, the α-helical AM1 module and an additional hydrophobic moiety to provide for better anchoring at the oil-water interface. Both AM-S and C-AM at low bulk concentration of 20 μM were able to adsorb rapidly at the oil-water interface and reduced interfacial tension to equilibrium values of 17.0 and 8.4 mN/m within 400 s, respectively. Their relatively quick adsorption kinetics allowed the formation of nanoemulsions with smaller droplet sizes and narrower size distribution. AM-S and C-AM at 800 μM bulk concentration could make nanoemulsions of average diameters 180 and 147 nm, respectively, by simple sonication. With respect to the long-term stability, a minimum peptide concentration of 400 μM for AM-S and a lower concentration of 100 μM for C-AM were demonstrated to effectively stabilize nanoemulsions over 3 weeks. Compared to AM1, the AM-S nanoemulsion retained its stimuli-responsive function triggered by metal ions, whereas the C-AM nanoemulsions did not respond to the stimuli as efficiently as AM-S because of the strong anchoring ability of the hydrophobic C8 module. The two-module design of AM-S and C-AM represents a new strategy in tuning the surface activity of peptide surfactants, offering useful information and guidance of future designs.
Formatted abstract
Designed peptide surfactants offer a number of advanced properties over conventional petrochemical surfactants, including biocompatibility, sustainability, and tailorability of the chemical and physical properties through peptide design. Their biocompatibility and degradability make them attractive for various applications, particularly for food and pharmaceutical applications. In this work, two new peptide surfactants derived from an amphiphilic peptide surfactant (AM1) were designed (AM-S and C8-AM) to better understand links between structure, interfacial activity and emulsification. Based on AM1, which has an interfacial α-helical structure, AM-S and C8-AM were designed to have two modules, that is, the α-helical AM1 module and an additional hydrophobic moiety to provide for better anchoring at the oil–water interface. Both AM-S and C8-AM at low bulk concentration of 20 µM were able to adsorb rapidly at oil–water interface, and reduced interfacial tension to equilibrium values of 17.0 mN/m and 8.4 mN/m within 400 s, respectively. Their relatively quick adsorption kinetics allowed the formation of nanoemulsions with smaller droplet sizes and narrower size distribution. AM-S and C8-AM at 800 µM bulk concentration could make nanoemulsions of average diameter 180 nm and 147 nm, respectively, by simple sonication. With respect to the long-term stability, a minimum peptide concentration of 400 µM for AM-S and a lower concentration of 100 µM for C8-AM were demonstrated to effectively stabilize nanoemulsions over three weeks. Compared to AM1, the AM-S nanoemulsion retained its stimuli-responsive function triggered by metal ions, whereas the C8-AM nanoemulsions did not respond to the stimuli as efficiently as AM-S because of the strong anchoring ability of the hydrophobic C8 module. The two-module design of AM-S and C8-AM represents a new strategy in tuning the surface activity of peptide surfactants, offering useful information and guidance of future designs.
Keyword Peptide
Surfactants
Amphiphilic peptide surfactant (AM1)
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DP150100798
FT140100726
FT140100726
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 24 Jul 2017, 08:06:40 EST by David Wibowo on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology