Isolation and characterization of Avibacterium paragallinarum with different nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide requirements

Jeong, Ok-Mi, Kang, Min-Su, Jeon, Byung-Woo, Choi, Byung-Kook, Kwon, Yong-Kuk, Yoon, So-Youn, Blackall, Patrick J., Lee, Hee-Soo, Jung, Suk-Chan and Kim, Jae-Hong (2017) Isolation and characterization of Avibacterium paragallinarum with different nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide requirements. Veterinary Microbiology, 205 62-65. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2017.05.005


Author Jeong, Ok-Mi
Kang, Min-Su
Jeon, Byung-Woo
Choi, Byung-Kook
Kwon, Yong-Kuk
Yoon, So-Youn
Blackall, Patrick J.
Lee, Hee-Soo
Jung, Suk-Chan
Kim, Jae-Hong
Title Isolation and characterization of Avibacterium paragallinarum with different nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide requirements
Formatted title
Isolation and characterization of Avibacterium paragallinarum with different nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide requirements
Journal name Veterinary Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-1135
1873-2542
Publication date 2017-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.vetmic.2017.05.005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 205
Start page 62
End page 65
Total pages 4
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject 2404 Microbiology
3400 Veterinary
Abstract Twenty field isolates of Avibacterium paragallinarum were obtained from chickens in South Korea during 2011–2015. The isolates were identified by a HPG-2 PCR assay specific for A. paragallinarum and by biochemical tests. Growth requirements, Page serovars, carbohydrate fermentation patterns, and antimicrobial susceptibility were also examined. Most isolates (16/20) showed the typical requirement for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and an enriched CO atmosphere for growth. One isolate needed increased levels of NAD and serum for good growth. Three isolates showed NAD-independent growth on blood agar under aerobic conditions. In terms of carbohydrate fermentation patterns, three biochemical biovars were recognized; these varied with respect to acid production from maltose and D-xylose. The 16 typical NAD-dependent isolates were serovar A while the variants, both NAD-independent isolates and the isolate with increased NAD dependency were non-typeable. All isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, gentamicin, and spectinomycin. High rates of resistance, including intermediate resistance, to lincomycin (100%), cloxacillin (75%), and erythromycin (70%) were observed. The four variant strains (the three NAD-independent isolates and the isolate showing unusual growth requirements) were more resistant to antibiotics than the typical NAD-dependent strains. The finding of NAD-independent forms of A. paragallinarum extends the known distribution of this form, previously only reported in South Africa, Mexico and Peru. There is clearly a need for increased caution in the diagnosis and, possibly, the control of infectious coryza.
Formatted abstract
Twenty field isolates of Avibacterium paragallinarum were obtained from chickens in South Korea during 2011–2015. The isolates were identified by a HPG-2 PCR assay specific for A. paragallinarum and by biochemical tests. Growth requirements, Page serovars, carbohydrate fermentation patterns, and antimicrobial susceptibility were also examined. Most isolates (16/20) showed the typical requirement for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and an enriched CO2 atmosphere for growth. One isolate needed increased levels of NAD and serum for good growth. Three isolates showed NAD-independent growth on blood agar under aerobic conditions. In terms of carbohydrate fermentation patterns, three biochemical biovars were recognized; these varied with respect to acid production from maltose and D-xylose. The 16 typical NAD-dependent isolates were serovar A while the variants, both NAD-independent isolates and the isolate with increased NAD dependency were non-typeable. All isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, gentamicin, and spectinomycin. High rates of resistance, including intermediate resistance, to lincomycin (100%), cloxacillin (75%), and erythromycin (70%) were observed. The four variant strains (the three NAD-independent isolates and the isolate showing unusual growth requirements) were more resistant to antibiotics than the typical NAD-dependent strains. The finding of NAD-independent forms of A. paragallinarum extends the known distribution of this form, previously only reported in South Africa, Mexico and Peru. There is clearly a need for increased caution in the diagnosis and, possibly, the control of infectious coryza.
Keyword Infectious coryza
NAD
Antimicrobial resistance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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