Genomic clustering of adaptive loci during parallel evolution of an Australian wildflower

Roda, Federico, Walter, Greg M., Nipper, Rick and Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel (2017) Genomic clustering of adaptive loci during parallel evolution of an Australian wildflower. Molecular Ecology, 26 14: 3687-3699. doi:10.1111/mec.14150


Author Roda, Federico
Walter, Greg M.
Nipper, Rick
Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel
Title Genomic clustering of adaptive loci during parallel evolution of an Australian wildflower
Journal name Molecular Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1365-294X
0962-1083
Publication date 2017-07-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/mec.14150
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 26
Issue 14
Start page 3687
End page 3699
Total pages 13
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
1311 Genetics
Abstract The build-up of the phenotypic differences that distinguish species has long intrigued biologists. These differences are often inherited as stable polymorphisms that allow the cosegregation of adaptive variation within species, and facilitate the differentiation of complex phenotypes between species. It has been suggested that the clustering of adaptive loci could facilitate this process, but evidence is still scarce. Here, we used QTL analysis to study the genetic basis of phenotypic differentiation between coastal populations of the Australian wildflower Senecio lautus. We found that a genomic region consistently governs variation in several of the traits that distinguish these contrasting forms. Additionally, some of the taxon-specific traits controlled by this QTL cluster have evolved repeatedly during the adaptation to the same habitats, suggesting that it could mediate divergence between locally adapted forms. This cluster contains footprints of divergent natural selection across the range of S. lautus, which suggests that it could have been instrumental for the rapid diversification of this species.
Formatted abstract
The build-up of the phenotypic differences that distinguish species has long intrigued biologists. These differences are often inherited as stable polymorphisms that allow the cosegregation of adaptive variation within species, and facilitate the differentiation of complex phenotypes between species. It has been suggested that the clustering of adaptive loci could facilitate this process, but evidence is still scarce. Here, we used QTL analysis to study the genetic basis of phenotypic differentiation between coastal populations of the Australian wildflower Senecio lautus. We found that a genomic region consistently governs variation in several of the traits that distinguish these contrasting forms. Additionally, some of the taxon-specific traits controlled by this QTL cluster have evolved repeatedly during the adaptation to the same habitats, suggesting that it could mediate divergence between locally adapted forms. This cluster contains footprints of divergent natural selection across the range of S. lautus, which suggests that it could have been instrumental for the rapid diversification of this species.
Keyword Adaptation
Ecotypes
Parallel speciation
QTL mapping
Supergenes
Transplant experiment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DP120104559
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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