Multiple viral infections in primary effusion lymphoma: a model of viral cooperation in lymphomagenesis

Gloghini, Annunziata, Volpi, Chiara C., Gualeni, Ambra V., Dolcetti, Riccardo, Bongarzone, Italia, De Paoli, Paolo and Carbone, Antonino (2017) Multiple viral infections in primary effusion lymphoma: a model of viral cooperation in lymphomagenesis. Expert Review of Hematology, 10 6: 505-514. doi:10.1080/17474086.2017.1326815


Author Gloghini, Annunziata
Volpi, Chiara C.
Gualeni, Ambra V.
Dolcetti, Riccardo
Bongarzone, Italia
De Paoli, Paolo
Carbone, Antonino
Title Multiple viral infections in primary effusion lymphoma: a model of viral cooperation in lymphomagenesis
Journal name Expert Review of Hematology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1747-4094
1747-4086
Publication date 2017-06-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1080/17474086.2017.1326815
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 10
Issue 6
Start page 505
End page 514
Total pages 10
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 2720 Hematology
Abstract Introduction: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare B-cell lymphoid neoplasm mainly associated with HIV infection, presenting as pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions. A defining property of PEL is its consistent association with Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, and, in most cases, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) co-infection. On these grounds, a review of the literature related to viral cooperation and lymphomagenesis can help to understand the complex interplay between KSHV and EBV in PEL pathogenesis. Areas covered: In this review, the authors highlight clinical, pathologic, genetic and proteomic features of PEL, in the context of viral cooperation in PEL lymphomagenesis. Expert commentary: Tumour cells are characterized by the overexpression of genes that are involved in inflammation and invasion. Coherently, PEL secretomes are enriched in proteins probably responsible for the particular tropism (cell adhesion and migration) of PEL cells. The development of PEL in HIV+ patients is multifactorial and involves a complex interplay among co-infection with oncogenic viruses (EBV and KSHV), inflammatory factors, and environmental conditions.
Formatted abstract
Introduction: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare B-cell lymphoid neoplasm mainly associated with HIV infection, presenting as pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions. A defining property of PEL is its consistent association with Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, and, in most cases, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) co-infection. On these grounds, a review of the literature related to viral cooperation and lymphomagenesis can help to understand the complex interplay between KSHV and EBV in PEL pathogenesis.

Areas covered: In this review, the authors highlight clinical, pathologic, genetic and proteomic features of PEL, in the context of viral cooperation in PEL lymphomagenesis.

Expert commentary: Tumour cells are characterized by the overexpression of genes that are involved in inflammation and invasion. Coherently, PEL secretomes are enriched in proteins probably responsible for the particular tropism (cell adhesion and migration) of PEL cells. The development of PEL in HIV+ patients is multifactorial and involves a complex interplay among co-infection with oncogenic viruses (EBV and KSHV), inflammatory factors, and environmental conditions.
Keyword EBV
HIV-associated lymphomas
KSHV
Large cell lymphomas
Lymphomagenesis
Primary effusion lymphoma
Viral cooperation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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