Residential and lifestyle changes for adults with an intellectual disability in Queensland 1960-2001

Young, L. (2003) Residential and lifestyle changes for adults with an intellectual disability in Queensland 1960-2001. International Journal of Disability, Development & Education, 50 1: 93-106. doi:10.1080/1034912032000053368


Author Young, L.
Title Residential and lifestyle changes for adults with an intellectual disability in Queensland 1960-2001
Journal name International Journal of Disability, Development & Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-912X
Publication date 2003-01-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1080/1034912032000053368
Volume 50
Issue 1
Start page 93
End page 106
Total pages 14
Editor C. van Kraayenoord
Place of publication Oxfordshire, U.K.
Publisher Carfax Publishing
Language eng
Subject 130312 Special Education and Disability
Abstract As we celebrate 50 years of the Schonell Special Education Research Centre it is timely to consider changes that have occurred in the provision of residential services for people with an intellectual disability. Before the 1970s adults and children were cared for in large institutions using a medical model of care. In the mid-1970s a new developmental model based on education and training was implemented in response to the principle of normalisation and issues of social justice. The most dramatic changes have occurred in the last ten years with the decision to close large institutions and relocate residents into ordinary homes in the community. This paper describes changes in lifestyle for adults with an intellectual disability as a result of the move from institutional to community residential service provision. The Challinor Centre in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia provides examples of lifestyle changes that have occurred under different models of service provision during this time. Community living is described with research evidence validating the advantages of this type of service provision for residents with an intellectual disability. Outcomes have been documented through the use of group results and a case study of one individual following deinstitutionalisation describes the benefits of this new model of residential accommodation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 12:20:13 EST