Comment on "Separate evolutionary origins of teeth from evidence in fossil jawed vertebrates"

Burrow, Carole J. (2003) Comment on "Separate evolutionary origins of teeth from evidence in fossil jawed vertebrates". Science, 300 5626: 1661b-1661b. doi:10.1126/science.1083877


Author Burrow, Carole J.
Title Comment on "Separate evolutionary origins of teeth from evidence in fossil jawed vertebrates"
Formatted title
Comment on “Separate evolutionary origins of teeth from evidence in fossil jawed vertebrates”
Journal name Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0036-8075
1095-9203
Publication date 2003-06-13
Year available 2003
Sub-type Editorial
DOI 10.1126/science.1083877
Volume 300
Issue 5626
Start page 1661b
End page 1661b
Total pages 1
Place of publication Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Publisher American Association for the Advancement Science
Language eng
Subject C1
270501 Animal Systematics, Taxonomy and Phylogeny
750899 Heritage not elsewhere classified
0603 Evolutionary Biology
0606 Physiology
Formatted abstract
Meredith Smith and Johanson suggested that “real” teeth evolved at least twice, based on their purported absence in basal placoderms and their presence in more derived placoderm taxa and all other more crownward-jawed vertebrates. The assertion by Meredith Smith and Johanson that the dental structures in the derived placoderms are “real” teeth is based on two criteria: That the “tooth” development was patterned and regulated (from which a dental lamina was inferred), and that the “teeth” are formed of regular tubular dentine. I believe that this conclusion is based on a false premise, as tubercles forming staggered rows—similar to those illustrated in (1)—are seen on the gnathals (jaw bones or plates) of several basal placoderms. The arrangement and morphological and histological structure of these tubercles is often comparable to that of the tubercular ornament on dermal plates forming the head and trunk shields.

In conclusion, the evidence still overwhelmingly supports the derivation of placoderm “teeth” from denticles of the dermal skeleton, and fails to support the interpretation of these structures as “real” teeth.
Keyword Australia
Placoderm scales
Fish
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes Published under "Technical Comments"

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 12:12:32 EST