The purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase is a major target antigen for cell-mediated immunity to malaria

Makobongo, Morris O., Riding, George, Xu, Huji, Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit, Keough, Dianne, de Jersey, John, Willadsen, Peter and Good, Michael F. (2003) The purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase is a major target antigen for cell-mediated immunity to malaria. Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences of The United States of America, 100 5: 2628-2633. doi:10.1073/pnas.0337659100


Author Makobongo, Morris O.
Riding, George
Xu, Huji
Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit
Keough, Dianne
de Jersey, John
Willadsen, Peter
Good, Michael F.
Title The purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase is a major target antigen for cell-mediated immunity to malaria
Journal name Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences of The United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
Publication date 2003-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0337659100
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 100
Issue 5
Start page 2628
End page 2633
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Language eng
Subject C1
320202 Cellular Immunology
730101 Infectious diseases
Abstract Although there is good evidence that immunity to the blood stages of malaria parasites can be mediated by different effector components of the adaptive immune system, target antigens for a principal component, effector CD4(+) T cells, have never been defined. We generated CD4+ T cell lines to fractions of native antigens from the blood stages of the rodent parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, and identified fraction-specific T cells that had a Th1 phenotype (producing IL-2, IFN-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-a, but not IL-4, after antigenic stimulation). These T cells could inhibit parasite growth in recipient severe combined immunodeficient mice. N-terminal sequencing of the fraction showed identity with hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGXPRT). Recombinant HGXPRT from the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, activated the T cells in vitro, and immunization of normal mice with recombinant HGXPRT reduced parasite growth rates in all mice after challenge.
Keyword Immunology
Cd4(+) T-cells
Merozoite Surface Protein-1
Plasmodium-falciparum
Mice
Parasite
Infection
Chabaudi
Antibody
Yoelii
Gamma
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 11:56:44 EST