Low temperature induced spikelet sterility in rice. I. Nitrogen fertilisation and sensitive reproductive period

Gunawardena, T. A., Fukai, S. and Blamey, F. P. C. (2003) Low temperature induced spikelet sterility in rice. I. Nitrogen fertilisation and sensitive reproductive period. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, 54 10: 937-946. doi:10.1071/AR03075


Author Gunawardena, T. A.
Fukai, S.
Blamey, F. P. C.
Title Low temperature induced spikelet sterility in rice. I. Nitrogen fertilisation and sensitive reproductive period
Journal name Australian Journal of Agricultural Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9409
Publication date 2003-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AR03075
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 54
Issue 10
Start page 937
End page 946
Total pages 10
Editor J. Fegent
S. Banerjee
Place of publication Melbourne
Publisher CSIRO
Language eng
Subject C1
300203 Plant Improvement (Selection, Breeding and Genetic Engineering)
620501 Field crops
Abstract Low temperature during panicle development in rice increases spikelet sterility. This effect is exacerbated by high rates of nitrogen (N) application in the field. Spikelet sterility induced by low temperature and N fertilisation was examined in glasshouse experiments to clarify the mechanisms involved. In two glasshouse experiments, 12-h periods of low (18/13degreesC) and high (28/23degreesC) day/night temperatures were imposed over periods of 5-7 days during panicle development, to determine the effects of low temperature and N fertilisation on spikelet sterility. In one experiment, 50% sunlight was imposed together with low temperature to investigate the additive effects of reduced solar radiation and low temperature. The effect of increased tillering due to N fertilisation was examined by a tiller removal treatment in the same experiment. Pollen grain number and spikelet sterility were recorded at heading and harvest, respectively. Although there was no significant effect of low temperature on spikelet sterility in the absence of applied N, low temperature greatly increased spikelet sterility as a result of a reduction in the number of engorged pollen grains per anther in the presence of applied N. Spikelet sterility was strongly correlated with the number of engorged pollen grains per anther. Low temperature during very early ( late stage of spikelet differentiation-pollen mother cell stage) and peak ( second meiotic division stage-early stage of extine formation) microspore development caused a severe reduction in engorged pollen production mainly as a result of reduced total pollen production. Unlike low temperature, the effect of shading was rather small. The increased tillering due to application of high rates of N, increased both spikelet number per plant and spikelet sterility under low temperature conditions. The removal of tillers as they appeared reduced the number of total spikelets per plant and maintained a large number of engorged pollen grains per anther which, in turn, reduced spikelet sterility. The number of engorged pollen grains per anther determined the numbers of intercepted and germinated pollen grains on the stigma. It is concluded that N increased tillering and spikelet number per plant and this, in turn, reduced the number of engorged pollen grains per anther, leading into increased spikelet sterility under low temperature condition.
Keyword Agriculture, Multidisciplinary
Rice (oryza Sativa L.)
Microspore Development
Engorged Pollen Grain
Young Microspore Stage
Cooling Treatment
Plants
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 11:53:49 EST