Demystifying the clinical diagnosis of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in women

Ganderton, Charlotte, Semciw, Adam, Cook, Jill and Pizzari, Tania (2017) Demystifying the clinical diagnosis of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in women. Journal of Women's Health, 26 6: 633-643. doi:10.1089/jwh.2016.5889


Author Ganderton, Charlotte
Semciw, Adam
Cook, Jill
Pizzari, Tania
Title Demystifying the clinical diagnosis of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in women
Journal name Journal of Women's Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1931-843X
1540-9996
Publication date 2017-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1089/jwh.2016.5889
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 26
Issue 6
Start page 633
End page 643
Total pages 11
Place of publication New Rochelle, NY, United States
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 10 clinical tests that can be used in the diagnosis of greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) in women, and to compare these clinical tests to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.

Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight participants with GTPS (49.5 ± 22.0 years) and 18 asymptomatic participants (mean age ± standard deviation [SD], 52.5 ± 22.8 years) were included. A blinded physiotherapist performed 10 pain provocation tests potentially diagnostic for GTPS - palpation of the greater trochanter, resisted external derotation test, modified resisted external derotation test, standard and modified Ober's tests, Patrick's or FABER test, resisted hip abduction, single-leg stance test, and the resisted hip internal rotation test. A sample of 16 symptomatic and 17 asymptomatic women undertook a hip MRI scan. Gluteal tendons were evaluated and categorized as no pathology, mild tendinosis, moderate tendinosis/partial tear, or full-thickness tear.

Results: Clinical test analyses show high specificity, high positive predictive value, low to moderate sensitivity, and negative predictive value for most clinical tests. All symptomatic and 88% of asymptomatic participants had pathological gluteal tendon changes on MRI, from mild tendinosis to full-thickness tear.

Conclusions: The study found the Patrick's or FABER test, palpation of the greater trochanter, resisted hip abduction, and the resisted external derotation test to have the highest diagnostic test accuracy for GTPS. Tendon pathology on MRI is seen in both symptomatic and asymptomatic women.
Keyword Bursitis
Hip
Magnetic resonance imaging
Tendinopathy
Tendinosis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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