Epizootic activity of Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin viruses in an aboriginal community in the Southeast Kimberley region of Western Australia: Results of mosquito fauna and virus isolation studies

Broom, Annette K., Lindsay, Michael D. A., Wright, Anthony E., Smith, David W. and MacKenzie, John S. (2003) Epizootic activity of Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin viruses in an aboriginal community in the Southeast Kimberley region of Western Australia: Results of mosquito fauna and virus isolation studies. American Journal of Tropical Medicine And Hygiene, 69 3: 277-283.


Author Broom, Annette K.
Lindsay, Michael D. A.
Wright, Anthony E.
Smith, David W.
MacKenzie, John S.
Title Epizootic activity of Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin viruses in an aboriginal community in the Southeast Kimberley region of Western Australia: Results of mosquito fauna and virus isolation studies
Journal name American Journal of Tropical Medicine And Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9637
1476-1645
Publication date 2003-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 69
Issue 3
Start page 277
End page 283
Total pages 7
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene
Language eng
Subject C1
270303 Virology
270304 Infectious Agents
270504 Invertebrate Biology
730101 Infectious diseases
780105 Biological sciences
730206 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
Abstract We undertook annual surveys of flavivirus virus activity in the community of Billiluna of Western Australia in the southeast Kimberley region between 1989 and 2001. Culex annulirostris was the dominant mosquito species, particularly in years of above average rains and flooding. Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE) virus was isolated in 8 of the 13 years of the study from seven mosquito species, but more than 90% of the isolates were from Cx. annulirostris. The results suggest that MVE virus is epizootic in the region, with activity only apparent in years with average or above average rainfall and increased numbers of Cx. annulirostris. High levels of MVE virus activity and associated human cases were detected only once (in 1993) during the survey period. Activity of MVE virus could only be partially correlated with wet season rainfall and flooding, suggesting that a number of other factors must also be considered to accurately predict MVE virus activity at such communities.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Tropical Medicine
Culex-annulirostris
Human-disease
Arboviruses
Transmission
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 11:35:08 EST