Numerical simulations of wind and temperature structure within an Alpine lake basin, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand

Zawar-Reza, P., McGowan, H. A., Sturman, A. P. and Kossmann, M. (2004) Numerical simulations of wind and temperature structure within an Alpine lake basin, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand. Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, 85 3-4: 245-260. doi:10.1007/s00703-003-0045-8


Author Zawar-Reza, P.
McGowan, H. A.
Sturman, A. P.
Kossmann, M.
Title Numerical simulations of wind and temperature structure within an Alpine lake basin, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand
Journal name Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0177-7971
Publication date 2004-06-01
Year available 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00703-003-0045-8
Volume 85
Issue 3-4
Start page 245
End page 260
Total pages 16
Editor Steinacker
Place of publication Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
260602 Climatology (incl. Palaeoclimatology)
770103 Weather
Abstract High-resolution numerical model simulations have been used to study the local and mesoscale thermal circulations in an Alpine lake basin. The lake (87 km(2)) is situated in the Southern Alps, New Zealand and is located in a glacially excavated rock basin surrounded by mountain ranges that reach 3000 m in height. The mesoscale model used (RAMS) is a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model with a level 2.5 turbulence closure scheme. The model demonstrates that thermal forcing at local (within the basin) and regional (coast-to-basin inflow) scales drive the observed boundary-layer airflow in the lake basin during clear anticyclonic summertime conditions. The results show that the lake can modify (perturb) both the local and regional wind systems. Following sunrise, local thermal circulations dominate, including a lake breeze component that becomes embedded within the background valley wind system. This results in a more divergent flow in the basin extending across the lake shoreline. However, a closed lake breeze circulation is neither observed nor modelled. Modelling results indicate that in the latter part of the day when the mesoscale (coast-to-basin) inflow occurs, the relatively cold pool of lake air in the basin can cause the intrusion to decouple from the surface. Measured data provide qualitative and quantitative support for the model results.
Keyword Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
Boundary-layer Evolution
Regional-scale Flows
Mexico-city Basin
Mountainous Terrain
Complex Terrain
Heat
Circulations
Plateau
Model
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes Published online: 28 November 2003

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 11:26:54 EST