The role of nematodes, fungi, bacteria, and abiotic factors in the etiology of apple replant problems in the granite belt of queensland

Dullahide S.R., Stirling G.R., Nikulin A. and Stirling A.M. (1994) The role of nematodes, fungi, bacteria, and abiotic factors in the etiology of apple replant problems in the granite belt of queensland. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, 34 8: 1177-1182. doi:10.1071/EA9941177


Author Dullahide S.R.
Stirling G.R.
Nikulin A.
Stirling A.M.
Title The role of nematodes, fungi, bacteria, and abiotic factors in the etiology of apple replant problems in the granite belt of queensland
Journal name Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0816-1089
Publication date 1994-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/EA9941177
Volume 34
Issue 8
Start page 1177
End page 1182
Total pages 6
Language eng
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Abstract Investigations of apple replant failure in the Granite Belt suggested that the problem had a complex etiology. Soil fertility was an important factor because apple seedlings grew best in replant soils with high levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Consistent improvements in the growth of apple seedlings were obtained when typical orchard soils were treated with fenamiphos, confirming that lesion nematode was also an important component of the disease complex. Pratylenchus penetrans had been recognised as a pathogen of apples, and pathogenicity tests showed that P. jordanensis, another species widely distributed in the Granite Belt, had similar effects. Growth responses of apple seedlings were greater when soil was pasteurised than when it was treated with fenamiphos, suggesting that root pathogens other than nematodes were involved in apple replant failure. However, the primary cause probably differed between orchards because soils did not respond in the same manner to pasteurisation and nematicide treatments. Pathogenicity tests with 14 bacteria associated with apple roots showed no effect on the growth of apple seedlings. However, Fusarium tricinctum, Cylindrocarpon destructans, and Pythium sp. were implicated in the problem because they were consistently recovered from discoloured roots. In a factorial experiment involving nematodes and fungi in pots, P. jordanensis, P. penetrans, E. tricinctum, and C. destructans reduced the dry weight of apple roots but there was no interaction between nematodes and fungi.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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