Chromosomal gains and losses in ocular melanoma detected by comparative genomic hybridization in an Australian population-based study

Vajdic, C. M., Hutchins, A-M., Kricker, A., Aitken, J. F., Armstrong, B. K., Hayward, N. K. and Armes, J. E. (2003) Chromosomal gains and losses in ocular melanoma detected by comparative genomic hybridization in an Australian population-based study. Cancer Genetics & Cytogenetics, 144 1: 12-17. doi:10.1016/S0165-4608(02)00868-3


Author Vajdic, C. M.
Hutchins, A-M.
Kricker, A.
Aitken, J. F.
Armstrong, B. K.
Hayward, N. K.
Armes, J. E.
Title Chromosomal gains and losses in ocular melanoma detected by comparative genomic hybridization in an Australian population-based study
Journal name Cancer Genetics & Cytogenetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0165-4608
Publication date 2003-01-01
Year available 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0165-4608(02)00868-3
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 144
Issue 1
Start page 12
End page 17
Total pages 6
Editor A. A. Sandberg
Place of publication New York
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
321011 Medical Genetics
730107 Inherited diseases (incl. gene therapy)
Abstract To define the location of potential oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in ocular melanoma we carried out comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis on a population-based series of 25 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumors comprising 17 choroidal, 2 ciliary body, 4 iris, and 2 conjunctival melanomas. Twelve (48%) of the 25 melanomas showed no chromosomal changes and 13 (52%) had at least one chromosomal gain or loss. The mean number of CGH changes in all tumors was 3.3, with similar mean numbers of chromosomal gains (1.5) and losses (1.8). The highest number of chromosomal changes (i.e., nine) occurred in a conjunctival melanoma and included four changes not observed in tumors at any other ocular site (gains in 22q and 11p and losses in 6p and 17p). The most frequent gains in all primary ocular melanomas were on chromosome arm 8q (69%), 6p (31%) and 8p (23%) and the most frequent losses were on 6q (38%), 10q (23%), and 16q (23%). The most common pairing was gain in 8p and gain in 8q, implying a whole chromosome copy number increase; gains in 8p occurred only in conjunction with gains in 8q. The smallest regions of copy number alteration were mapped to gain of 8q21 and loss of 6q21, 10q21, and 16q22. Sublocalization of these chromosomal changes to single-band resolution should accelerate the identification of genes involved in the genesis of ocular melanoma.
Keyword Oncology
Genetics & Heredity
Oncology
Genetics & Heredity
GENETICS & HEREDITY
ONCOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 05:31:48 EST