Vitamin D and the brain: genomic and non-genomic actions

Cui, Xiaoying, Gooch, Helen, Petty, Alice, McGrath, John J. and Eyles, Darryl (2017) Vitamin D and the brain: genomic and non-genomic actions. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, 453 C: 131-143. doi:10.1016/j.mce.2017.05.035


Author Cui, Xiaoying
Gooch, Helen
Petty, Alice
McGrath, John J.
Eyles, Darryl
Title Vitamin D and the brain: genomic and non-genomic actions
Journal name Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1872-8057
0303-7207
Publication date 2017-06-01
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.mce.2017.05.035
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 453
Issue C
Start page 131
End page 143
Total pages 13
Place of publication E Park, Shannon, Clare Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Language eng
Subject 1303 Biochemistry
1312 Molecular Biology
1310 Endocrinology
Abstract 1,25(OH)(2)D-3 (vitamin D) is well-recognized as a neurosteroid that modulates multiple brain functions. A growing body of evidence indicates that vitamin D plays a pivotal role in brain development, neuro-transmission, neuroprotection and immunomodulation. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which vitamin D exerts these functions in the brain are still unclear. Vitamin D signalling occurs via the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a zinc-finger protein in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Like other nuclear steroids, vitamin D has both genomic and non-genomic actions. The transcriptional activity of vitamin D occurs via the nuclear VDR Its faster, non-genomic actions can occur when the VDR is distributed outside the nucleus. The VDR is present in the developing and adult brain where it mediates the effects of vitamin D on brain development and function. The purpose of this review is to summarise the in vitro and in vivo work that has been conducted to characterise the genomic and non-genomic actions of vitamin D in the brain. Additionally we link these processes to functional neurochemical and behavioural outcomes. Elucidation of the precise molecular mechanisms underpinning vitamin D signalling in the brain may prove useful in understanding the role this steroid plays in brain ontogeny and function. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
1,25(OH)2D3 (vitamin D) is well-recognized as a neurosteroid that modulates multiple brain functions. A growing body of evidence indicates that vitamin D plays a pivotal role in brain development, neurotransmission, neuroprotection and immunomodulation. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which vitamin D exerts these functions in the brain are still unclear. Vitamin D signalling occurs via the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a zinc-finger protein in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Like other nuclear steroids, vitamin D has both genomic and non-genomic actions. The transcriptional activity of vitamin D occurs via the nuclear VDR. Its faster, non-genomic actions can occur when the VDR is distributed outside the nucleus. The VDR is present in the developing and adult brain where it mediates the effects of vitamin D on brain development and function. The purpose of this review is to summarise the in vitro and in vivo work that has been conducted to characterise the genomic and non-genomic actions of vitamin D in the brain. Additionally we link these processes to functional neurochemical and behavioural outcomes. Elucidation of the precise molecular mechanisms underpinning vitamin D signalling in the brain may prove useful in understanding the role this steroid plays in brain ontogeny and function.
Keyword Brain
Genomic and non-genomic action
VDR
Vitamin D
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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