Conservation physiology and the quest for a 'good' Anthropocene

Madliger, Christine L., Franklin, Craig E., Hultine, Kevin R., van Kleunen, Mark, Lennox, Robert J., Love, Oliver P., Rummer, Jodie L. and Cooke, Steven J. (2017) Conservation physiology and the quest for a 'good' Anthropocene. Conservation Physiology, 5 1: . doi:10.1093/conphys/cox003


Author Madliger, Christine L.
Franklin, Craig E.
Hultine, Kevin R.
van Kleunen, Mark
Lennox, Robert J.
Love, Oliver P.
Rummer, Jodie L.
Cooke, Steven J.
Title Conservation physiology and the quest for a 'good' Anthropocene
Journal name Conservation Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2051-1434
Publication date 2017-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/conphys/cox003
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 1
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Abstract It has been proposed that we are now living in a new geological epoch known as the Anthropocene, which is specifically defined by the impacts that humans are having on the Earth's biological diversity and geology. Although the proposal of this term was borne out of an acknowledgement of the negative changes we are imparting on the globe (e.g. climate change, pollution, coastal erosion, species extinctions), there has recently been action amongst a variety of disciplines aimed at achieving a ‘good Anthropocene’ that strives to balance societal needs and the preservation of the natural world. Here, we outline ways that the discipline of conservation physiology can help to delineate a hopeful, progressive and productive path for conservation in the Anthropocene and, specifically, achieve that vision. We focus on four primary ways that conservation physiology can contribute, as follows: (i) building a proactive approach to conservation; (ii) encouraging a pragmatic perspective; (iii) establishing an appreciation for environmental resilience; and (iv) informing and engaging the public and political arenas. As a collection of passionate individuals combining theory, technological advances, public engagement and a dedication to achieving conservation success, conservation physiologists are poised to make meaningful contributions to the productive, motivational and positive way forward that is necessary to curb and reverse negative human impact on the environment.
Keyword Anthropocene
Evidence-based conservation
Pragmatism
Public outreach
Resilience
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 26 Jun 2017, 01:00:43 EST by Web Cron on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)