The suitability of written education materials for stroke survivors and their carers

Eames, Sally, McKenna, Kryss, Worrall, Linda and Read, Stephen (2003) The suitability of written education materials for stroke survivors and their carers. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 10 3: 70-83. doi:10.1310/KQ70-P8UD-QKYT-DMG4

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Author Eames, Sally
McKenna, Kryss
Worrall, Linda
Read, Stephen
Title The suitability of written education materials for stroke survivors and their carers
Journal name Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1074-9357
1945-5119
Publication date 2003-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1310/KQ70-P8UD-QKYT-DMG4
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 10
Issue 3
Start page 70
End page 83
Total pages 14
Place of publication Leeds, W Yorks, United Kingdom
Publisher Maney Publishing
Language eng
Abstract This study evaluated the suitability of written materials for stroke survivors and their carers. Twenty stroke survivors and 14 carers were interviewed about the stroke information they had received and their perceptions of the content and presentation of materials of increasing reading difficulty. The mean readability level of materials (grade 9) was higher than participants’ mean reading ability (grade 7–8). Satisfaction with materials decreased as the content became more difficult to read. Seventy-five percent reported that their information needs were not met in hospital. More stroke survivors with aphasia wanted support from health professionals to read and understand written information, and identified simple language, large font size, color, and diagrams to complement the text as being important features of written materials. Simple materials that meet clients’ information needs and design preferences may optimally inform them about stroke.
Keyword Aphasia
Patient education
Readability
Written information
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 05:18:40 EST