Testosterone is correlated with courtship but not aggression in the tropical buff-banded rail, Gallirallus philippensis

Wiley, C. J. and Goldizen, A. W. (2003) Testosterone is correlated with courtship but not aggression in the tropical buff-banded rail, Gallirallus philippensis. Hormones And Behavior, 43 5: 554-560. doi:10.1016/S0018-506X(03)00066-7


Author Wiley, C. J.
Goldizen, A. W.
Title Testosterone is correlated with courtship but not aggression in the tropical buff-banded rail, Gallirallus philippensis
Journal name Hormones And Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0018-506X
Publication date 2003-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0018-506X(03)00066-7
Volume 43
Issue 5
Start page 554
End page 560
Total pages 7
Place of publication San Diego
Publisher Academic Press INC Elsevier Science
Language eng
Subject C1
270707 Sociobiology and Behavioural Ecology
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Past studies into the roles of testosterone in birds have focused on species that occur in temperate regions. In such species, plasma testosterone levels are high during the establishment of territories in the spring and are associated with increased aggression. In contrast to most temperate species, tropical birds frequently defend territories year-round, during which time territoriality often occurs in a nonsexual context. The few studies that have been carried out on tropical birds show lower levels of circulating testosterone than occur in their temperate counterparts. In some year-round territorial tropical species, testosterone and aggression are dissociated, while in other species testosterone still plays a role in regulating aggression. This study examined the relationship between aggression and plasma testosterone levels in a year-round territorial, subtropical population of the buff-banded rail with characteristics typical of tropical species. Peak testosterone levels were substantially lower than those found in temperate species. Males displayed a seasonal peak in plasma testosterone level when their partners were most likely to be fertile. At other times, testosterone levels were mostly undetectable, despite year-round territoriality. We found that T levels increased with courtship behavior but showed no relationship with aggression, supporting the hypothesis that dissociation between testosterone and territoriality may be widespread among tropical avian taxa. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
Keyword Behavioral Sciences
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Testosterone
Tropical Bird
Territoriality
Courtship
Rallidae
Browed Sparrow Weaver
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Juncos
Territorial Aggression
Plocepasser-mahali
Luteinizing-hormone
Steroid-hormones
European Robins
Life Histories
Mating Systems
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 05:15:31 EST